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Keeping Up with the Joneses: Evidence from Micro Data

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  • Enrichetta Ravina

    () (Economics Northwestern University)

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  • Enrichetta Ravina, 2005. "Keeping Up with the Joneses: Evidence from Micro Data," 2005 Meeting Papers 557, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed005:557
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Yun Kim & Soon Ryoo, 2013. "Income Distribution, Consumer Debt, and Keeping Up with the Joneses: a Kaldor-Minsky-Veblen Model," Working Papers 1302, Trinity College, Department of Economics.
    2. Po-Ting Liu & Guang-Zhen Sun, 2005. "The International Demonstration Effect And The Domestic Division Of Labour: A Simple Model," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 10(4), pages 515-528, December.
    3. Doi, Junko & Mino, Kazuo, 2008. "A variety-expansion model of growth with external habit formation," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(10), pages 3055-3083, October.
    4. Alvarez-Cuadrado, Francisco, 2008. "Growth outside the stable path: Lessons from the European reconstruction," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 568-588, April.
    5. Sumit Agarwal & John C Driscoll & Xavier Gabaix & David Laibson, 2008. "Learning in the Credit Card Market," Levine's Working Paper Archive 122247000000002028, David K. Levine.
    6. repec:eee:transa:v:106:y:2017:i:c:p:22-50 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Paya, Ivan & Wang, Peng, 2016. "Wealth fluctuations and investment in risky assets: The UK micro evidence on households asset allocation," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 38(PA), pages 221-235.
    8. Levy, Moshe & Levy, Haim, 2015. "Keeping up with the Joneses and optimal diversification," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 29-38.
    9. Markus K. Brunnermeier & Stefan Nagel, 2006. "Do Wealth Fluctuations Generate Time-varying Risk Aversion? Micro-Evidence on Individuals' Asset Allocation," NBER Working Papers 12809, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    habit persistence; micro data; equity premium; aggregation;

    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth

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