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Sovereign risk, bank funding and investors’ pessimism

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  • Faia, Ester

Abstract

Evidence shows that sovereign risk increases funding cost and risk of banks highly exposed to it. I build a model that rationalizes this fact. Banks act as delegated monitors and invest in risky projects and in risky sovereign bonds. As investors hear rumors of increased asset risk, they run the bank through an information coordination game. Banks could rollover liquidity in repo market using government bonds as collateral, but as sovereign risk raises collateral values shrink. Overall banks’ liquidity falls (its cost increases) and so does banks’ credit. The model features a balance sheet, a collateral channel and a liquidity channel of sovereign risk. The latter two play a major role in the fiscal transmission.

Suggested Citation

  • Faia, Ester, 2017. "Sovereign risk, bank funding and investors’ pessimism," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 79-96.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:79:y:2017:i:c:p:79-96
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jedc.2017.03.010
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    Cited by:

    1. Erica Perego, 2018. "Sovereign risk and asset market dynamics in the euro area," Documents de recherche 18-01, Centre d'Études des Politiques Économiques (EPEE), Université d'Evry Val d'Essonne.
    2. Leonello, Agnese, 2018. "Government guarantees and the two-way feedback between banking and sovereign debt crises," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(3), pages 592-619.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Liquidity risk; Sovereign risk; Banks’ funding costs;

    JEL classification:

    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • G3 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance
    • E6 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook

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