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Corruption'S Direct Effects On Per-Capita Income Growth: A Meta-Analysis

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  • Mehmet Ugur

Abstract

Corruption is a symptom of weak institutional quality and could have potentially adverse effects on economic growth. However, heterogeneity in reported findings makes it difficult to synthesize the evidence base with a view to test competing hypotheses and/or support evidence-based policy and practice. To address this issue, we have extracted 327 estimates of corruption's direct effect on per-capita GDP growth from 29 primary studies, following a peer-reviewed and pre-published systematic review protocol. Precision-effect and funnel asymmetry tests indicate that corruption has a negative effect on per-capita GDP growth after controlling for publication selection bias and within-study dependence. However, multivariate meta-regression analysis results indicate that the overall effect is not robust to inclusion of moderating variables through a general-to-specific procedure for model specification. We report that the marginal effect of corruption on per-capita GDP growth is more adverse when the primary study estimates relate to long-run growth, are based on low-income-country data only, and extracted from journal papers. The effect is less adverse in studies that use the International Country Risk Guide corruption perceptions index and in those reporting estimates from two-stage least-squares estimations.

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  • Mehmet Ugur, 2014. "Corruption'S Direct Effects On Per-Capita Income Growth: A Meta-Analysis," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(3), pages 472-490, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jecsur:v:28:y:2014:i:3:p:472-490
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    1. Sefa Awaworyi Churchill & Mehmet Ugur & Siew Ling Yew, 2017. "Does Government Size Affect Per-Capita Income Growth? A Hierarchical Meta-Regression Analysis," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 93(300), pages 142-171, March.
    2. Fernando Delbianco & Carlos Dabús & María angeles Caraballo pou, 2016. "Growth, Inequality and Corruption: Evidence from Developing Countries," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 36(3), pages 1811-1820.
    3. Hamdi, Helmi & Hakimi, Abdelaziz, 2015. "Corruption, FDI and Growth: All the truths of a corrupted regime before and after the social upsurge in Tunisia," MPRA Paper 63748, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Dimant, Eugen, 2014. "The Antecedents and Effects of Corruption - A Reassessment of Current (Empirical) Findings," MPRA Paper 60947, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Sefa Awaworyi & Siew Ling Yew, 2014. "The Effect of Military Expenditure on Growth: An Empirical Synthesis," Monash Economics Working Papers 25-14, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    6. repec:spr:revint:v:12:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11558-017-9273-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Stefan Borsky & Esther Blanco, 2014. "Setting one voluntary standard in a heterogeneous Europe - EMAS, corruption and stringency of environmental regulations," Working Papers 2014-29, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
    8. d'Agostino, G. & Dunne, J.P. & Pieroni, L., 2016. "Corruption and growth in Africa," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 71-88.
    9. Sefa Awaworyi & Siew Ling Yew, 2014. "Government Transfers and Growth: Is there Evidence of Genuine Effect?," Monash Economics Working Papers 40-14, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    10. Sefa K. Awaworyi, 2014. "The Impact of Microfinance Interventions: A Meta-analysis," Monash Economics Working Papers 03-14, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    11. Eunji Kim & Yoonhee Ha & Sangheon Kim, 2017. "Public Debt, Corruption and Sustainable Economic Growth," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(3), pages 1-30, March.
    12. Farooq, Abdul & Shahbaz, Muhammad & Arouri, Mohamed & Teulon, Frédéric, 2013. "Does corruption impede economic growth in Pakistan?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 622-633.
    13. Andrey V. Aistov & Elvina Mukhametova, 2015. "Determinants Of Corruption Perceptions: Transitional Vs. Developed Economies," HSE Working papers WP BRP 89/EC/2015, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    14. Awaworyi Churchill, Sefa & Korankye Danso, Jeffrey & Appau, Samuelson, 2015. "Microcredit and Poverty Reduction in Bangladesh: Beyond Publication Bias, Does Genuine Effect Exist?," EconStor Preprints 123722, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.
    15. Sefa Awaworyi & Vinod Mishra, 2014. "Returns to Education in China: A Meta-analysis," Monash Economics Working Papers 41-14, Monash University, Department of Economics.

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