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Meta-Regression Analysis: A Quantitative Method of Literature Survey s

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  • Stanley, T D
  • Jarrell, Stephen B

Abstract

Pedagogically, literature reviews are instrumental. They summarize the large literature written on a particular topic, give coherence to the complex, often disparate, views expressed about an issue, and serve as a springboard for new ideas. However, literature surveys rarely establish anything approximating unanimous consensus. Ironically, this is just as true for the empirical economic literature. To harmonize this dissonance, we offer a quantitative methodology for reviewing the empirical economic literature. Meta-regression analysis (MRA) is the regression analysis of regression analyses. MRA tends to objectify the review process. It studies the processes that produce empirical economic results as though they were any other social scientific phenomenon. MRA provides a framework for replication and offers a sensitivity analysis for model specification. In this brief essay, we propose an new method of reviewing economic literature, MRA, and discuss its potential. Copyright 1989 by Blackwell Publishers Ltd

Suggested Citation

  • Stanley, T D & Jarrell, Stephen B, 1989. "Meta-Regression Analysis: A Quantitative Method of Literature Survey s," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(2), pages 161-170.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jecsur:v:3:y:1989:i:2:p:161-70
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. T. D. Stanley & Stephen B. Jarrell, 2005. "Meta‐Regression Analysis: A Quantitative Method of Literature Surveys," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 299-308, July.
    2. Stephen B. Jarrell & T. D. Stanley, 2004. "Declining Bias and Gender Wage Discrimination? A Meta-Regression Analysis," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(3).
    3. Milton Friedman, 1957. "Introduction to "A Theory of the Consumption Function"," NBER Chapters, in: A Theory of the Consumption Function, pages 1-6, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Leamer, Edward E & Leonard, Herman B, 1983. "Reporting the Fragility of Regression Estimates," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 65(2), pages 306-317, May.
    5. Milton Friedman, 1957. "A Theory of the Consumption Function," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number frie57-1.
    6. Stanley, T. D., 1986. "Stein-rule least squares estimation : A heuristic for fallible data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 147-150.
    7. Leibenstein, Harvey, 1985. "On relaxing the maximization postulate," Journal of Behavioral Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 5-20.
    8. Stanley, T. D., 1986. "Recursive economic knowledge: Hierarchy, maximization and behavioral economics," Journal of Behavioral Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 85-99.
    9. repec:eee:labchp:v:2:y:1986:i:c:p:1139-1181 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. T. D. Stanley, 2005. "Beyond Publication Bias," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 309-345, July.
    11. T.D. Stanley & Stephen B. Jarrell, 1998. "Gender Wage Discrimination Bias? A Meta-Regression Analysis," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(4), pages 947-973.
    12. Chris Doucouliagos, 2005. "Publication Bias in the Economic Freedom and Economic Growth Literature," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 367-387, July.
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