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Corruption, Seigniorage and Growth: Theory and Evidence

  • Keith Blackburn
  • Kyriakos C. Neanidis
  • M. Emranul Haque

This paper presents an analysis of the effect of bureaucratic corruption on economic growth through a public finance transmission channel. At the theoretical level, we develop a simple dynamic general equilibrium model in which financial intermediaries make portfolio decisions on behalf of agents, and bureaucrats collect tax revenues on behalf of the government. Corruption takes the form of the embezzlement of public funds, the effect of which is to increase the government’s reliance on seigniorage finance. This leads to an increase in inflation which, in turn, reduces capital accumulation and growth. At the empirical level, we use data on 82 countries over a 20-year period to test the predictions of our model. Taking proper account of the government’s budget constraint, we find strong evidence to support these predictions under different estimation strategies. Our results are robust to a wide range of sensitivity tests.

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Paper provided by CESifo Group Munich in its series CESifo Working Paper Series with number 2354.

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Date of creation: 2008
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Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_2354
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  1. Ajit Mishra, 2000. "Hierarchies, Incentives And Collusion In A Model Of Enforcement," Dundee Discussion Papers in Economics 112, Economic Studies, University of Dundee.
  2. K Blackburn & G F Forgues-Puccio, 2004. "Distribution and Development in a Model of Misgovernance," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 42, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
  3. Toke S. Aidt, 2003. "Economic analysis of corruption: a survey," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(491), pages F632-F652, November.
  4. Aidt, Toke & Dutta, Jayasri & Sena, Vania, 2008. "Governance regimes, corruption and growth: Theory and evidence," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 195-220, June.
  5. Ritva Reinikka & Jakob Svensson, 2005. "Fighting Corruption to Improve Schooling: Evidence from a Newspaper Campaign in Uganda," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(2-3), pages 259-267, 04/05.
  6. Miller, Stephen M & Russek, Frank S, 1997. "Fiscal Structures and Economic Growth: International Evidence," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(3), pages 603-13, July.
  7. Basu, Kaushik & Bhattacharya, Sudipto & Mishra, Ajit, 1992. "Notes on bribery and the control of corruption," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 349-359, August.
  8. Marco Espinosa & Chong K. Yip, 2000. "Government Financing in an Endogenous Growth Model with Financial Market Restrictions," Departmental Working Papers _118, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Economics.
  9. Kwabena Gyimah-Brempong, 2002. "Corruption, economic growth, and income inequality in Africa," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 3(3), pages 183-209, November.
  10. Kneller, Richard & Bleaney, Michael F. & Gemmell, Norman, 1999. "Fiscal policy and growth: evidence from OECD countries," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 171-190, November.
  11. Ahlin, Christian & Pang, Jiaren, 2008. "Are financial development and corruption control substitutes in promoting growth?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(2), pages 414-433, June.
  12. Blundell, R. & Bond, S., 1995. "Initial Conditions and Moment Restrictions in Dynamic Panel Data Models," Economics Papers 104, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  13. Espinosa-Vega, Marco A & Yip, Chong K, 1999. "Fiscal and Monetary Policy Interactions in an Endogenous Growth Model with Financial Intermediaries," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 40(3), pages 595-615, August.
  14. Bose, Gautam, 2004. "Bureaucratic delays and bribe-taking," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 313-320, July.
  15. Huang, Haizhou & Wei, Shang-Jin, 2005. "Monetary Policies for Developing Countries: The Role of Institutional Quality," CEPR Discussion Papers 4911, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  16. Kevin Hjortshøj O'Rourke & Richard S. Grossman & Madalina A. Ursu, 2013. "A monthly stock exchange index for Ireland, 1864-1930," Economics Series Working Papers 120, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  17. Patrick A. Imam & Davina F. Jacobs, 2007. "Effect of Corruptionon Tax Revenues in the Middle East," IMF Working Papers 07/270, International Monetary Fund.
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