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Social Cohesion, Institutions, and Growth

Author

Listed:
  • William Easterly
  • Jozef Ritzan
  • Michael Woolcock

Abstract

We present evidence that measures of “social cohesion,” such as income inequality and ethnic fractionalization, endogenously determine institutional quality, which in turn casually determines growth.

Suggested Citation

  • William Easterly & Jozef Ritzan & Michael Woolcock, 2006. "Social Cohesion, Institutions, and Growth," Working Papers 94, Center for Global Development.
  • Handle: RePEc:cgd:wpaper:94
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    File URL: http://www.cgdev.org/content/publications/detail/9136
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Daniel Kaufmann & Shang-Jin Wei, 1999. "Does "Grease Money" Speed Up the Wheels of Commerce?," NBER Working Papers 7093, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    3. Alberto Alesina & Eliana La Ferrara, 2000. "The Determinants of Trust," NBER Working Papers 7621, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Dani Rodrik, 1998. "Has Globalization Gone Too Far?," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(2), pages 81-94, March.
    5. Mr. Hamid R Davoodi & Mr. Vito Tanzi, 1997. "Corruption, Public Investment, and Growth," IMF Working Papers 1997/139, International Monetary Fund.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Political institutions; social cohesion; poverty; economic policy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H5 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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