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Job insecurity and job satisfaction in the United States: the case of public sector union workers

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  • Benjamin Artz
  • Ilker Kaya

Abstract

We measure the association between perceived job insecurity and job satisfaction in the United States and focus on public sector union workers. Job satisfaction decreases with perceived job insecurity among union workers in the public sector and primarily when tenure with an employer is high.

Suggested Citation

  • Benjamin Artz & Ilker Kaya, 2014. "Job insecurity and job satisfaction in the United States: the case of public sector union workers," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(2), pages 103-120, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:indrel:v:45:y:2014:i:2:p:103-120
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/irj.12044
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Christine Lücke & Andreas Knabe, 2018. "How Much Does Others' Protection Matter? Employment Protection, Future Labour Market Prospects and Well-Being," CESifo Working Paper Series 6936, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Lücke, Christine, 2017. "How much does others’ protection matter? Employment protection and well-being," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168096, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. Dirlam, Jonathan & Zheng, Hui, 2017. "Job satisfaction developmental trajectories and health: A life course perspective," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 178(C), pages 95-103.

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