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The rise in female participation in Colombia: Fertility, marital status or education?

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  • Diego Amador
  • Ximena Peña

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  • Raquel Bernal

Abstract

Colombia has experienced a secular increase in the labor participation of urban women, going from nearly 47% in 1984 to 65% in 2006. We decompose the evolution of participation into changes in the composition of the population and changes in the participation rates by groups (defined according to the variables that appear most relevant: educational attainment, fertility and marital status). The increase in participation is driven by the increase in the participation rate of married or cohabiting women and women with low educational attainment. Fertility status appears to be less important. Changes in the population composition by educational attainment are also relevant in explaining the increase in participation. However, changes in composition by marital status or fertility are second order effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Diego Amador & Ximena Peña & Raquel Bernal, 2013. "The rise in female participation in Colombia: Fertility, marital status or education?," Revista ESPE - Ensayos sobre Política Económica, Banco de la Republica de Colombia, vol. 31(71), pages 54-63, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdr:ensayo:v:31:y:2013:i:71:p:54-63
    DOI: 10.1016/S0120-4483(13)70010-1
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0120-4483(13)70010-1
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    7. Carrasco, Raquel, 2001. "Binary Choice with Binary Endogenous Regressors in Panel Data: Estimating the Effect of Fertility on Female Labor Participation," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 19(4), pages 385-394, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ana María Iregui-Bohórquez & Ligia Alba Melo-Becerra & María Teresa Ramírez-Giraldo & Ana María Tribín-Uribe, 2020. "The path to gender equality in Colombia: Are we there yet?," Borradores de Economia 1131, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    2. Ana María Iregui-Bohórquez & Ligia Alba Melo-Becerra & María Teresa Ramírez-Giraldo, 2015. "Estado de salud y participación laboral: Evidencia para Colombia," BORRADORES DE ECONOMIA 012497, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA.
    3. Ximena Peña & Juan Camilo Cárdenas & Hugo Ñopo & Jorge Luis Castañeda, 2013. "Mujer y movilidad social," Documentos CEDE 010498, Universidad de los Andes - CEDE.
    4. Julio E. Romero Prieto, 2018. "La maternidad y el empleo formal en Colombia," Documentos de trabajo sobre Economía Regional y Urbana 268, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    5. Natalia Ramírez Bustamante & Ana Maria Tribin Uribe & Carmiña O. Vargas, 2015. "Maternity and Labor Markets: Impact of Legislation in Colombia," BORRADORES DE ECONOMIA 012610, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA.
    6. Camila Uribe Mejía, 2014. "Bancarización y Empoderamiento Femenino," Documentos CEDE 011001, Universidad de los Andes - CEDE.
    7. Serrano, Joaquín & Gasparini, Leonardo & Marchionni, Mariana & Glüzmann, Pablo, 2019. "Economic cycle and deceleration of female labor force participation in Latin America," Journal for Labour Market Research, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany], vol. 53(1), pages .13(1-21).
    8. Ana María Iregui-Bohórquez & Ligia Alba Melo-Becerra & María Teresa Ramírez-Giraldo, 2016. "Health status and labor force participation: evidence for urban low and middle income individuals in Colombia," Portuguese Economic Journal, Springer;Instituto Superior de Economia e Gestao, vol. 15(1), pages 33-55, April.
    9. Erika Raquel Badillo & Lina Cardona-Sosa & Carlos Medina & Leonardo Fabio Morales & Christian Posso, 2019. "Twin instrument, fertility and women’s labor force participation: evidence from Colombian low-income families," Borradores de Economia 1071, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    10. Leonardo Gasparini & Mariana Marchionni & Nicolás Badaracco & Joaquín Serrano, 2015. "Female Labor Force Participation in Latin America: Evidence of Deceleration," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0181, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    11. Iván Bornacelly, 2013. "Educación técnica y tecnológica para la reducción de la desigualdad salarial y la pobreza," Revista Desarrollo y Sociedad, Universidad de los Andes - CEDE, June.
    12. Luz Karime Abadía Alvarado & Sara De la Rica, 2020. "The evolution of the gender wage gap in Colombia: 1994 and 2010," Revista Cuadernos de Economía, Universidad Nacional de Colombia -FCE - CID, vol. 39(81), pages 857-895, July.
    13. Leonardo Gasparini & Mariana Marchionni, 2015. "Bridging Gender Gaps? The Rise and Deceleration of Female Labor Force Participation in Latin America: An overview," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0185, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender; Labor Force Participation; Colombia;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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