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Citations for "The Consequences of The Decline in Public Sector Pay in Britain: A Little Bit of Evidence"

by Stephen Nickell & Glenda Quintini

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  1. Köllő, János, 2013. "A közszféra bérszintje és a magánszektorból átlépők szelekciója 1997-2008 között
    [Public-sector pay and flows from the private to the public sector]
    ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(5), pages 523-554.
  2. Emma Hall & Carol Propper & John Van Reenen, 2008. "Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance," CEP Discussion Papers dp0843, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  3. Masayuki Morikawa, 2014. "A Comparison of the Wage Structure between the Public and Private Sectors in Japan," AJRC Working Papers 1407, Australia-Japan Research Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  4. António Afonso & Pedro Gomes, 2008. "Interactions between Private and Public Sector Wages," Working Papers Department of Economics 2008/55, ISEG - School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, University of Lisbon.
  5. Faggio, Giulia & Overman, Henry, 2014. "The effect of public sector employment on local labour markets," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 91-107.
  6. Grönqvist, Erik & Vlachos, Jonas, 2008. "One size fits all? The effects of teacher cognitive and non-cognitive abilities on student achievement," Working Paper Series 2008:25, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  7. Bargain, Olivier & Melly, Blaise, 2008. "Public Sector Pay Gap in France: New Evidence Using Panel Data," IZA Discussion Papers 3427, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Richard Disney & Amanda Gosling, 2008. "Changing public sector wage differentials in the UK," IFS Working Papers W08/02, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  9. Niklas Potrafke, 2006. "Parties Matter in Allocating Expenditures: Evidence from Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 652, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  10. Hatsor, Limor, 2012. "Occupational choice: Teacher quality versus teacher quantity," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 608-623.
  11. Torberg Falch & Kaare Johansen & Bjarne Stroem, 2008. "Teacher shortages and the business cycle," Working Paper Series 9608, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
  12. Chatterji, Monojit & Mumford, Karen A., 2007. "The Public-Private Sector Wage Differential for Full-Time Male Employees in Britain: A Preliminary Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 2781, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  13. Burgess, Simon & Propper, Carol & Ratto, Marisa & Tominey, Emma, 2012. "Incentives in the Public Sector: Evidence from a Government Agency," CEPR Discussion Papers 9071, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  14. Stephen Nickell, 2004. "Poverty And Worklessness In Britain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(494), pages C1-C25, 03.
  15. Disney, Richard F & Gosling, Amanda, 2003. "A New Method for Estimating Public Sector Pay Premia: Evidence from Britain in the 1990's," CEPR Discussion Papers 3787, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  16. Grönqvist, Erik & Vlachos, Jonas, 2008. "One Size Fits All? The Effects of Teacher Cognitive and Non-cognitive Abilities on Student," Working Paper Series 779, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  17. Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez & Peter Dolton & Gerald Makepeace, 2004. "Career Progression: Getting-On, Getting-By And Going Nowhere," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2004 159, Royal Economic Society.
  18. Maczulskij, Terhi, 2013. "Employment sector and pay gaps: Genetic and environmental influences," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 89-96.
  19. Richard Disney & Carl Emmerson & Gemma Tetlow, 2007. "What is a public sector pension worth?," IFS Working Papers W07/17, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  20. Monojit Chatterji & Terhi Maczulskij & Jaakko Pehkonen, 2008. "Public Sector Pay in Finland," Dundee Discussion Papers in Economics 213, Economic Studies, University of Dundee.
  21. Helene Turon & Fabien Postel-Vinay, 2005. "The Public Pay Gap in Britain: Small Differences that (Don't?) Matter," 2005 Meeting Papers 92, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  22. Jelena Lauçev, 2012. "Public-Private Earnings Differentials during Economic Transition in Hungary," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 1202, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  23. Chatterji, Monojit & Mumford, Karen, 2008. "Flying High and Laying Low in the Public and Private Sectors: A Comparison of Pay Differentials for Full-Time Male Employees in Britain," SIRE Discussion Papers 2008-11, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
  24. Sandra McNally, 2010. "Evaluating education policies: the evidence from economic research," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 57973, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  25. Peter Dolton, 2004. "Recruiting High Quality Teachers," CESifo DICE Report, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 2(4), pages 11-20, 01.
  26. Terhi Maczulskij, 2012. "Employment sector and pay gaps: genetic and environmental influences," ERSA conference papers ersa12p755, European Regional Science Association.
  27. David Greenaway & Michelle Haynes, 2003. "Funding Higher Education in The UK: The Role of Fees and Loans," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages F150-F166, February.
  28. Jelena Lausev, 2014. "WHAT HAS 20 YEARS OF PUBLIC–PRIVATE PAY GAP LITERATURE TOLD US? EASTERN EUROPEAN TRANSITIONING vs. DEVELOPED ECONOMIES," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(3), pages 516-550, 07.
  29. repec:ehl:lserod:50482 is not listed on IDEAS
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