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Career Progression: Getting-On, Getting-By And Going Nowhere

  • Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez
  • Peter Dolton
  • Gerald Makepeace

This research examines the 'career progression' of individuals by studying how an individual's ranking within their cohort changes over their lifetime. We compare the relative position of individuals using educational test scores at ages 11 and 16 and earnings at ages 33 and 42. Our goal is to establish the contribution of early ability, educational achievement and labour market experience to the relative movements of individuals within their cohort. We use the National Child Development Study to assess this intra-cohort career progress employing descriptive and fixed effect regression methods to describe the process. We report how career progression differs for men and women.

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Paper provided by Royal Economic Society in its series Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2004 with number 159.

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Date of creation: 17 Sep 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ecj:ac2004:159
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  1. Jacob Mincer, 1958. "Investment in Human Capital and Personal Income Distribution," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 281.
  2. repec:tpr:qjecon:v:107:y:1992:i:2:p:439-79 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. Rosen, Sherwin, 1976. "A Theory of Life Earnings," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(4), pages S45-67, August.
  4. Derek Neal & Sherwin Rosen, 1998. "Theories of the Distribution of Labor Earnings," NBER Working Papers 6378, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Robert H. Topel & Michael P. Ward, 1988. "Job Mobility and the Careers of Young Men," NBER Working Papers 2649, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Neal, Derek, 1999. "The Complexity of Job Mobility among Young Men," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(2), pages 237-61, April.
  7. Derek Neal, 1998. "The Link between Ability and Specialization: An Explanation for Observed Correlations between Wages and Mobility Rates," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(1), pages 173-200.
  8. Stephen Nickell & Glenda Quintini, 2002. "The Consequences of The Decline in Public Sector Pay in Britain: A Little Bit of Evidence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(477), pages F107-F118, February.
  9. Mincer, Jacob, 1997. "The Production of Human Capital and the Life Cycle of Earnings: Variations on a Theme," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(1), pages S26-47, January.
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