IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ecj/ac2004/159.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Career Progression: Getting-On, Getting-By And Going Nowhere

Author

Listed:
  • Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez
  • Peter Dolton
  • Gerald Makepeace

Abstract

This research examines the 'career progression' of individuals by studying how an individual's ranking within their cohort changes over their lifetime. We compare the relative position of individuals using educational test scores at ages 11 and 16 and earnings at ages 33 and 42. Our goal is to establish the contribution of early ability, educational achievement and labour market experience to the relative movements of individuals within their cohort. We use the National Child Development Study to assess this intra-cohort career progress employing descriptive and fixed effect regression methods to describe the process. We report how career progression differs for men and women.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez & Peter Dolton & Gerald Makepeace, 2004. "Career Progression: Getting-On, Getting-By And Going Nowhere," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2004 159, Royal Economic Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:ac2004:159
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://repec.org/res2004/Marcenaro-GutierrezDoltonMakepeace.pdf
    File Function: full text
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Stephen Nickell & Glenda Quintini, 2002. "The Consequences of The Decline in Public Sector Pay in Britain: A Little Bit of Evidence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(477), pages 107-118, February.
    2. Derek Neal & Sherwin Rosen, 1998. "Theories of the Distribution of Labor Earnings," NBER Working Papers 6378, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Derek Neal, 1998. "The Link between Ability and Specialization: An Explanation for Observed Correlations between Wages and Mobility Rates," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(1), pages 173-200.
    4. Mincer, Jacob, 1997. "The Production of Human Capital and the Life Cycle of Earnings: Variations on a Theme," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(1), pages 26-47, January.
    5. Neal, Derek, 1999. "The Complexity of Job Mobility among Young Men," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(2), pages 237-261, April.
    6. Jacob Mincer, 1958. "Investment in Human Capital and Personal Income Distribution," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 281-281.
    7. Robert H. Topel & Michael P. Ward, 1992. "Job Mobility and the Careers of Young Men," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 439-479.
    8. Rosen, Sherwin, 1976. "A Theory of Life Earnings," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(4), pages 45-67, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Luis Alejandro Lopez-Agudo & Oscar David Marcenaro Gutierrez & Helena Ferreira-Marques, 2016. "Gender, institutions and educational achievement: a cross country comparison," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 11,in: José Manuel Cordero Ferrera & Rosa Simancas Rodríguez (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 11, edition 1, volume 11, chapter 20, pages 383-400 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    2. Miguel Ángel Ropero García & Oscar David Marcenaro Gutierrez & Luis Alejandro Lopez-Agudo, 2016. "Gender roles as indicator of academic failure," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 11,in: José Manuel Cordero Ferrera & Rosa Simancas Rodríguez (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 11, edition 1, volume 11, chapter 11, pages 227-248 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    3. María A. Davia & Óscar D. Marcenaro-Gutiérrez, 2007. "Exploring the link between employment search time and reservation wages in Southern Europe," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2007/13, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
    4. María Angeles Davia & Oscar D. Marcenaro Gutiérrez, 2008. "Exploring the link between employment search time and reservation," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 186(3), pages 91-121, October.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ecj:ac2004:159. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/resssea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.