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Gender roles as indicator of academic failure

In: Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 11

Author

Listed:
  • Miguel Ángel Ropero García

    () (Universidad de Málaga)

  • Oscar David Marcenaro Gutierrez

    () (Universidad de Málaga)

  • Luis Alejandro Lopez-Agudo

    () (Universidad de Malaga)

Abstract

Recent empirical literature has highlighted that boys and girls show differences in academic performance. The present study intends to disentangle the contribution of some –less well-known– factors to that gender gap between boys’ and girls’ achievement in the fourth level of secondary education. To this aim we use recent methodological advances in decomposition techniques applied to a rich dataset with information not only on students’ personal characteristics and family environment, but also on real scores –as marked by teachers–, academic track elections and expectations for academic success. Not surprisingly, we observe that girls are more likely to get better marks than boys, whereas boys are more likely to get the worst grades and to fail. More interestingly, expectations and post-compulsory academic elections have been found to explain most of this gap in favor of girls, denoting that girls are more responsible in the achievement of their goals and present higher productivity in studying, while boys rely more on their innate skills to pass. This could be highlighting gender differential attitudes and roles towards academic achievement, what denotes the need to perform policy interventions to the extent that academic achievement will condition career progression.

Suggested Citation

  • Miguel Ángel Ropero García & Oscar David Marcenaro Gutierrez & Luis Alejandro Lopez-Agudo, 2016. "Gender roles as indicator of academic failure," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 11,in: José Manuel Cordero Ferrera & Rosa Simancas Rodríguez (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 11, edition 1, volume 11, chapter 11, pages 227-248 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
  • Handle: RePEc:aec:ieed11:11-11
    as

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    File URL: http://repec.economicsofeducation.com/2016badajoz/11-11.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Paul Schultz, T., 2002. "Why Governments Should Invest More to Educate Girls," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 207-225, February.
    2. Myeong-Su Yun, 2005. "A Simple Solution to the Identification Problem in Detailed Wage Decompositions," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 43(4), pages 766-772, October.
    3. Helena Holmlund & Mikael Lindahl & Erik Plug, 2011. "The Causal Effect of Parents' Schooling on Children's Schooling: A Comparison of Estimation Methods," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(3), pages 615-651, September.
    4. Marianne Bertrand & Jessica Pan, 2013. "The Trouble with Boys: Social Influences and the Gender Gap in Disruptive Behavior," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 32-64, January.
    5. Basu, Alaka Malwade, 2002. "Why does Education Lead to Lower Fertility? A Critical Review of Some of the Possibilities," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(10), pages 1779-1790, October.
    6. Nicole M. Fortin & Philip Oreopoulos & Shelley Phipps, 2015. "Leaving Boys Behind: Gender Disparities in High Academic Achievement," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 50(3), pages 549-579.
    7. Peter Dolton & Gerald Makepeace & Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez, 2005. "Career progression: Getting-on, getting-by and going nowhere," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 237-255.
    8. Matthias Doepke & Michèle Tertilt, 2009. "Women's Liberation: What's in It for Men?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(4), pages 1541-1591.
    9. John R. Wolfe, 1982. "The Impact of Family Resources on Childhood IQ," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 17(2), pages 213-235.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender differences; students’ actual performance; decomposition methods;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • B54 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Feminist Economics

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