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Why does Education Lead to Lower Fertility? A Critical Review of Some of the Possibilities

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  • Basu, Alaka Malwade

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  • Basu, Alaka Malwade, 2002. "Why does Education Lead to Lower Fertility? A Critical Review of Some of the Possibilities," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(10), pages 1779-1790, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:30:y:2002:i:10:p:1779-1790
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jejeebhoy, Shireen J., 1995. "Women's Education, Autonomy, and Reproductive Behaviour: Experience from Developing Countries," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198290339.
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    1. Arusha Cooray, 2012. "Suffrage, Democracy and Gender Equality in Education," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(1), pages 21-47, June.
    2. Bilal Barakat & Rachel Durham, 2013. "Drop-out mayors and graduate farmers: Educational fertility differentials by occupational status and industry in six European countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(42), pages 1213-1262, June.
    3. -, 2006. "Social Panorama of Latin America 2005," Panorama Social de América Latina, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), number 1224 edited by Eclac, December.
    4. Murthi, Mamta, 2002. "Fertility Change in Asia and Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(10), pages 1769-1778, October.
    5. Ariane Utomo & Anna Reimondos & Iwu Utomo & Peter McDonald & Terence H. Hull, 2014. "What happens after you drop out? Transition to adulthood among early school-leavers in urban Indonesia," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(41), pages 1189-1218, April.
    6. Branisa, Boris & Klasen, Stephan & Ziegler, Maria, 2013. "Gender Inequality in Social Institutions and Gendered Development Outcomes," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 252-268.
    7. González De San Román, Ainara & De La Rica, Sara, 2016. "Gender Gaps in PISA Test Scores: The Impact of Social Norms and the Mother?s Transmission of Role Attitudes /Brechas de género en los resultados de PISA: El impacto de las normas sociales y la transmi," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 34, pages 79-108, Enero.
    8. Suleiman Abu-Bader & Daniel Gottlieb, 2009. "Poverty, education and employment in the Arab-Bedouin society: A comparative view," Working Papers 137, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    9. Sanjay K. Mohanty & Gunther Fink & Rajesh Chauhan & David Canning, 2016. "Distal determinants of fertility decline: Evidence from 640 Indian districts," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 34(13), pages 373-406, March.
    10. Boris Branisa & Stephan Klasen & Maria Ziegler, 2009. "Why we should all care about social institutions related to gender inequality," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 15, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    11. Alexander Stimpfle & David Stadelmann, 2016. "Marriage Age Affects Educational Gender Inequality: International Evidence," CREMA Working Paper Series 2016-02, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    12. סלימאן אבו-בדר ודר' דניאל גוטליב, 2009. "עוני, חינוך ותעסוקה בחברה הערבית-בדואית: מבט השוואתי (באנגלית)," Working Papers 357, National Insurance Institute of Israel.
    13. Wyndow, Paula & Li, Jianghong & Mattes, Eugen, 2013. "Female Empowerment as a Core Driver of Democratic Development: A Dynamic Panel Model from 1980 to 2005," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 34-54.
    14. Claude Diebolt & Cédric Doliger, 2005. "Becker vs. Easterlin. Education, Fertility and Growth in France after World War II," Working Papers 05-03, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
    15. Peng Yu, 2006. "Higher Education, the Bane of Fertility? An investigation with the HILDA Survey," CEPR Discussion Papers 512, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    16. Miguel Ángel Ropero García & Oscar David Marcenaro Gutierrez & Luis Alejandro Lopez-Agudo, 2016. "Gender roles as indicator of academic failure," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 11,in: José Manuel Cordero Ferrera & Rosa Simancas Rodríguez (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 11, edition 1, volume 11, chapter 11, pages 227-248 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    17. Baliamoune–Lutz, Mina & McGillivray, Mark, 2015. "The impact of gender inequality in education on income in Africa and the Middle East," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 1-11.
    18. Abhishek Kumar & Valeria Bordone & Raya Muttarak, 2016. "Like Mother(-in-Law) Like Daughter? Influence of the Older Generation’s Fertility Behaviours on Women’s Desired Family Size in Bihar, India," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 32(5), pages 629-660, December.
    19. Frédéric Docquier & B. Lindsay Lowell & Abdeslam Marfouk, 2009. "A Gendered Assessment of Highly Skilled Emigration," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 35(2), pages 297-321.
    20. M. L. Mabuza & G. F. Ortmann & E. Wale, 2016. "Frequency and extent of employing food insecurity coping strategies among rural households: determinants and implications for policy using evidence from Swaziland," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(1), pages 255-269, February.
    21. Tsung Huang & Tsun-Feng Chiang & Jiun-Nan Pan, 2015. "Fertility and Crime: Evidence from Spatial Analysis of Taiwan," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 319-327, September.
    22. Luca Zanin & Rosalba Radice & Giampiero Marra, 2015. "Modelling the impact of women’s education on fertility in Malawi," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(1), pages 89-111, January.
    23. Stefan Boes, 2009. "Partial Identification of Discrete Counterfactual Distributions with Sequential Update of Information," SOI - Working Papers 0918, Socioeconomic Institute - University of Zurich.
    24. Grasgruber, P. & Sebera, M. & Hrazdíra, E. & Cacek, J. & Kalina, T., 2016. "Major correlates of male height: A study of 105 countries," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 172-195.

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