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Public Sector Pay in the UK: Quantifying the Impact of the Review Bodies

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  • Peter Dolton
  • Gerald Makepeace
  • Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez

Abstract

type="main"> This paper examines the impact of the UK Public Sector Pay Review Bodies (PRBs) on the pay of their remit groups comparing the real weekly earnings of workers using ASHE and LFS data from 1993 to 2007 for 10 occupational subgroups. Using consecutive difference-in-differences we can identify whether the PRBs have had an impact by comparing the differences in pay for different occupations in successive time periods. Our examination of the annual changes in differentials suggest that the PRBs may have had relatively little systematic impact on earnings over and above that observed for comparable individuals working elsewhere in the public sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Dolton & Gerald Makepeace & Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez, 2015. "Public Sector Pay in the UK: Quantifying the Impact of the Review Bodies," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 83(6), pages 701-724, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:83:y:2015:i:6:p:701-724
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/manc.12081
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Danzer, Alexander M. & Dolton, Peter, 2011. "Total Reward in the UK in the Public and Private Sectors," IZA Discussion Papers 5656, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Alexander M. Danzer & Peter Dolton & Chiara Rosazza Bondibene, 2016. "Who Wins? Evaluating the Impact of UK Public Sector Pension Scheme Reforms," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 237(1), pages 38-46, August.

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