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A New Look at the Public Wage Premium in Italy: The Role of Schooling Endogeneity

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  • Paolo Ghinetti

Abstract

This paper uses a sample of male workers to estimate public and private wage structures and the public wage premium for Italy. Results from a model with endogenous sector and schooling suggest that public employees have on average lower unobserved wage potentials in both sectors than private employees, but work in the sector where they benefit from a comparative wage advantage. Schooling is positively correlated with wages in both sectors, and controlling for that is crucial to get more reliable estimates and predictions. The associated average unconditional public wage premium is 12 per cent. The net premium is 9 per cent, but not statistically significant.

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  • Paolo Ghinetti, 2014. "A New Look at the Public Wage Premium in Italy: The Role of Schooling Endogeneity," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 28(1), pages 87-111, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:28:y:2014:i:1:p:87-111
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/labr.12025
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    1. repec:bla:jpbect:v:19:y:2017:i:2:p:490-510 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:ecosys:v:41:y:2017:i:2:p:248-265 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Gabriele Cardullo, 2017. "The Welfare and Employment Effects of Centralized Public Sector Wage Bargaining," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 19(2), pages 490-510, April.

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