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The Economics of UK Teacher Supply: The Graduate's Decision


  • Dolton, Peter J


The problem of teacher supply in the United Kingdom has generated considerable concern recently. This paper studies a large cohort of graduates and their decision whether to become teachers or not. A full structure model of the individual's decision is estimated, which corrects for possible sample selection bias and models endogenously the role of relative earnings. The findings provide support for the estimation procedure used and attest to the importance of relative pay in the individual graduate's career decision. Copyright 1990 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Dolton, Peter J, 1990. "The Economics of UK Teacher Supply: The Graduate's Decision," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(400), pages 91-104, Supplemen.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:100:y:1990:i:400:p:91-104

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    References listed on IDEAS

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