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Does Improved Local Supply of Schooling Enhance Intergenerational Mobility in Education? Evidence from Jordan

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  • Assaad, Ragui
  • Saleh, Mohamed

Abstract

This paper examines the effect of increased local supply of schooling on intergenerational mobility in education in Jordan. We use a unique data set that links individual data on own schooling and parents’ schooling for adults, from a household survey, with the annual supply of schools in the sub-district of birth, from a school census. We identify the effect by exploiting the variation in the supply of basic and secondary public schools across cohorts and sub-districts of birth in Jordan, controlling for both cohort and sub-district of birth fixed effects. School availability is determined based on the number of sex-appropriate public schools in the individual’s sub-district of birth at the time the individual was ready to start that schooling stage. Our findings show that the local availability of basic public schools does in fact increase intergenerational mobility in education. For instance, an increase in the supply of basic public schools of one school per 1,000 people reduces the father-son and mother-son associations of schooling by 10 percent and the father-daughter and mother-daughter associations by nearly 30 percent. However, an increase in the local supply of secondary public schools does not seem to have a similar effect on intergenerational mobility in education.

Suggested Citation

  • Assaad, Ragui & Saleh, Mohamed, 2015. "Does Improved Local Supply of Schooling Enhance Intergenerational Mobility in Education? Evidence from Jordan," TSE Working Papers 15-549, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE), revised Aug 2015.
  • Handle: RePEc:tse:wpaper:28919
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    Cited by:

    1. Ahmed DRIOUCHI & Cristina BOBOC & Alae GAMAR, 2016. "Inequality In Educational Attainment of Females in Arab Countries: Comparisons to Eastern and Central European Economies," Romanian Journal of Economics, Institute of National Economy, vol. 43(2(52)), pages 34-60, december.
    2. Mongi Boughzala, 2017. "Employment and the Functioning of the Labor Market," Working Papers 1154, Economic Research Forum, revised 11 Sep 2003.
    3. Nicolas Fleury & Fabrice Gilles, 2015. "A meta-regression analysis on intergenerational transmission of education: publication bias and genuine empirical effect," TEPP Working Paper 2015-02, TEPP.
    4. Krafft, Caroline & Alawode, Halimat, 2018. "Inequality of opportunity in higher education in the Middle East and North Africa," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 234-244.
    5. Assaad, Ragui & Ginn, Thomas & Saleh, Mohamed, 2019. "Impact of Syrian Refugees on Education Outcomes in Jordan," CEPR Discussion Papers 14056, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Liang, Wenquan & Xue, Sen, 2021. "Pandemics and Intergenerational Mobility of Education: Evidence from the 2003 Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Epidemic in China," GLO Discussion Paper Series 779, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    7. Kolb, Michael & Neidhöfer, Guido & Pfeiffer, Friedhelm, 2019. "Intergenerational mobility and self-selection of asylum seekers in Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 19-027, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    8. Krafft Caroline & Assaad Ragui, 2021. "Introducing the Jordan Labor Market Panel Survey 2016," IZA Journal of Development and Migration, Sciendo & Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 12(1), pages 1-42, January.
    9. Emran, M. Shahe & Sun, Yan, 2014. "Are the Children of Uneducated Farmers Doubly Doomed? Farm, Nonfarm and Intergenerational Educational Mobility in Rural China," MPRA Paper 59230, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Ragui Assaad & Thomas Ginn & Mohamed Saleh, 2018. "Impact of Syrian Refugees in Jordan on Education Outcomes for Jordanian Youth," Working Papers 1214, Economic Research Forum, revised 04 Sep 2018.
    11. Florencia Torche, 2019. "Educational mobility in developing countries," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-88, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    12. Ragui Assaad & Caroline Krafft & Dominique J. Rolando, 2017. "The Role of Housing Markets in the Timing of Marriage in Egypt, Jordan, and Tunisia," Working Papers 1081, Economic Research Forum, revised 04 Oct 2017.
    13. M. Shahe Emran & Forhad Shilpi, 2019. "Economic approach to intergenerational mobility: Measures, methods, and challenges in developing countries," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-98, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    14. Ragui Assaad & Samir Ghazouani & Caroline Krafft & Dominique J. Rolando, 2016. "Introducing the Tunisia Labor Market Panel Survey 2014," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-21, December.
    15. Emran, M. Shahe & Greene, William H & Shilpi, Forhad, 2015. "When measure matters: coresident sample selection bias in estimating intergenerational mobility in developing countries," MPRA Paper 65920, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Michael Hebsaker & Guido Neidhöfer & Friedhelm Pfeiffer, 2021. "Intergenerational mobility and self-selection on unobserved skills: New evidence," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 55(1), pages 1-9, December.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Supply of schooling; education; intergenerational mobility; inequality of opportunity; Middle East;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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