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Intergenerational mobility and self-selection of asylum seekers in Germany

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  • Kolb, Michael
  • Neidhöfer, Guido
  • Pfeiffer, Friedhelm

Abstract

We exploit a novel survey of recently arrived asylum seekers in Germany in order to estimate the degree of intergenerational mobility in education among refugees and compare it to the educational mobility of similar-aged individuals in their region of origin. The findings show that the refugees in our sample display high rates of educational mobility, and that their upward mobility is rather high when compared to the reference group in their region of origin. These results suggest that there exists positive skill selection among recently arrived refugees in Germany.

Suggested Citation

  • Kolb, Michael & Neidhöfer, Guido & Pfeiffer, Friedhelm, 2019. "Intergenerational mobility and self-selection of asylum seekers in Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 19-027, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:19027
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    immigrant selection; asylum seekers; human capital; family background;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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