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Fair Progress?

Author

Listed:
  • Ambar Narayan
  • Roy Van der Weide
  • Alexandru Cojocaru
  • Christoph Lakner
  • Silvia Redaelli
  • Daniel Gerszon Mahler
  • Rakesh Gupta N. Ramasubbaiah
  • Stefan Thewissen

Abstract

Fair Progress? Economic Mobility Across Generations Around the World looks at an issue that has gotten much attention in the developed world, but with, for the first time, new data and analysis covering most of the world, including developing economies. The analysis examines whether those born in poverty or in prosperity are destined to remain in the same economic circumstances into which they were born, and looks back over a half a century at whether children’s lives are better or worse than their parents’ in different parts of the world. It suggests local, national, and global actions and policies that can help break the cycle of poverty, paving the way for the next generation to realize their potential and improve their lives.

Suggested Citation

  • Ambar Narayan & Roy Van der Weide & Alexandru Cojocaru & Christoph Lakner & Silvia Redaelli & Daniel Gerszon Mahler & Rakesh Gupta N. Ramasubbaiah & Stefan Thewissen, 2018. "Fair Progress?," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 28428.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:28428
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    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/28428/9781464812101.pdf?sequence=8
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Brunori, Paolo & Ferreira, Francisco H. G. & Peragine, Vito, 2013. "Inequality of opportunity, income inequality and economic mobility : some international comparisons," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6304, The World Bank.
    2. Harold Alderman & John Hoddinott & Bill Kinsey, 2006. "Long term consequences of early childhood malnutrition," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(3), pages 450-474, July.
    3. Marrero, Gustavo A. & Rodríguez, Juan G., 2013. "Inequality of opportunity and growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 107-122.
    4. Marrero,Gustavo Alberto & Rodriguez,Juan Gabriel & Van Der Weide,Roy, 2016. "Unequal opportunity, unequal growth," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7853, The World Bank.
    5. Orhan Torul & Oguz Oztunali, 2017. "Intergenerational Educational Mobility in Europe," Working Papers 2017/03, Bogazici University, Department of Economics.
    6. Ferreira, Francisco H. G. & Lakner, Christoph & Lugo, Maria Ana & Ozler, Berk, 2014. "Inequality of opportunity and economic growth : a cross-country analysis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6915, The World Bank.
    7. Raj Chetty & John N. Friedman & Nathaniel Hilger & Emmanuel Saez & Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach & Danny Yagan, 2011. "How Does Your Kindergarten Classroom Affect Your Earnings? Evidence from Project Star," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(4), pages 1593-1660.
    8. Gary S. Becker & Nigel Tomes, 1994. "Human Capital and the Rise and Fall of Families," NBER Chapters, in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education, Third Edition, pages 257-298, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Raj Chetty & Nathaniel Hendren & Lawrence F. Katz, 2016. "The Effects of Exposure to Better Neighborhoods on Children: New Evidence from the Moving to Opportunity Experiment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(4), pages 855-902, April.
    10. Alejandro Gaviria, 2007. "Social Mobility and Preferences for Redistribution in Latin America," Economía Journal, The Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association - LACEA, vol. 0(Fall 2007), pages 55-96, August.
    11. Martens, P.J. & Chateau, D.G. & Burland, E.M.J. & Finlayson, G.S. & Smith, M.J. & Taylor, C.R. & Brownell, M.D. & Nickel, N.C. & Katz, A. & Bolton, J.M. & Burchill, C. & Chartier, M. & Doupe, M. & Fra, 2014. "The effect of neighborhood socioeconomic status on education and health outcomes for children living in social housing," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 104(11), pages 2103-2113.
    12. Jacoby, Hanan G. & Mansuri, Ghazala, 2015. "Crossing boundaries: How social hierarchy impedes economic mobility," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 135-154.
    13. Michael R. Strain, 2016. "The US Labor Market: Questions and Challenges for Public Policy," Books, American Enterprise Institute, number 903666, September.
    14. repec:hrv:faseco:30367426 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Cojocaru, Alexandru, 2014. "Prospects of upward mobility and preferences for redistribution: Evidence from the Life in Transition Survey," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 300-314.
    16. Doan, Quang Hung & Nguyen, Ngoc Anh, 2016. "Intergenerational Income Mobility in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 70603, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Schöfberger, Irene, 2019. "Migration: solid nations and liquid transnationalism? The EU's struggle to find a shared course on African migration 1999-2019," Discussion Papers 1/2019, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE).
    2. Kolb, Michael & Neidhöfer, Guido & Pfeiffer, Friedhelm, 2019. "Intergenerational mobility and self-selection of asylum seekers in Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 19-027, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    3. Bertha Rohenkohl, 2019. "Intergenerational Income Mobility in the UK:New evidence using the BHPS and Understanding Society," Working Papers 2019017, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    4. Di Maio, Michele & Nisticò, Roberto, 2019. "The effect of parental job loss on child school dropout: Evidence from the Occupied Palestinian Territories," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 141(C).
    5. Peter Lanjouw & Hai-Anh Dang, 2018. "Inequality trends and dynamics in India: The bird’s-eye and the granular perspectives," WIDER Working Paper Series 189, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Emran, M. Shahe & Ferreira, Francisco & Jiang, Yajing & Sun, Yan, 2019. "Intergenerational Educational Mobility in Rural Economy: Evidence from China and India," MPRA Paper 94121, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Paul Hufe & Andreas Peichl & Daniel Weishaar, 2018. "Intergenerationelle Einkommensmobilität: Schlusslicht Deutschland?," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 71(20), pages 20-28, October.
    8. Roy van der Weide & Melinda Vigh, 2018. "Intergenerational mobility, human capital accumulation, and growth in India," WIDER Working Paper Series 187, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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