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ducational inequality and intergenerational mobility in Latin America: A new database

Author

Listed:
  • Guido Neidhöfer

    () (Freie Universität Berlin, Germany)

  • Joaquín Serrano

    () (CEDLAS Universidad Nacional de La Plata and CONICET, Argentina)

  • Leonardo Gasparini

    () (CEDLAS Universidad Nacional de La Plata and CONICET, Argentina)

Abstract

The causes and consequences of the intergenerational persistence of inequality are a topic of great interest among various fields in economics. However, until now, issues of data availability have restricted a broader and cross-national perspective on the topic. Based on rich sets of harmonized household survey data, we contribute to filling this gap computing time series for several indexes of relative and absolute intergenerational education mobility for 18 Latin American countries over 50 years, and making them publicly available. We find that intergenerational mobility has been rising in Latin America, on average. This pattern seems to be driven by the high upward mobility of children from low-educated families; at the same time, there is substantial immobility at the top of the distribution. Significant cross-country differences are observed and are associated with income inequality, poverty, economic growth, public educational expenditures and assortative mating.

Suggested Citation

  • Guido Neidhöfer & Joaquín Serrano & Leonardo Gasparini, 2017. "ducational inequality and intergenerational mobility in Latin America: A new database," Working Papers 443, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  • Handle: RePEc:inq:inqwps:ecineq2017-443
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Educational inequality and intergenerational mobility in Latin America: A new database
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2017-09-28 19:53:26

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    Cited by:

    1. M. Shahe Emran & Forhad Shilpi, 2019. "Economic approach to intergenerational mobility: Measures, methods, and challenges in developing countries," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-98, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Pessino, Carola & Izquierdo, Alejandro & Vuletin, Guillermo, 2020. "Better Spending for Better Lives: How Latin America and the Caribbean Can Do More with Less," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 9152 edited by Izquierdo, Alejandro -//- Pessino, Carola -//- Vuletin, Guillermo, July.
    3. Guido Neidhöfer, 2019. "Intergenerational mobility and the rise and fall of inequality: Lessons from Latin America," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 17(4), pages 499-520, December.
    4. Florencia Torche, 2019. "Educational mobility in developing countries," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-88, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Neri, Marcelo Côrtes & Bonomo, Tiago, 2017. "Returns and intergenerational mobility of education during period of falling earnings inequality in Brazil," FGV EPGE Economics Working Papers (Ensaios Economicos da EPGE) 793, EPGE Brazilian School of Economics and Finance - FGV EPGE (Brazil).
    6. Kolb, Michael & Neidhöfer, Guido & Pfeiffer, Friedhelm, 2019. "Intergenerational mobility and self-selection of asylum seekers in Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 19-027, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    7. Tharcisio Leone, 2019. "Intergenerational Mobility in Education: Estimates of the Worldwide Variation," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 44(4), pages 1-42, December.
    8. Marcelo Neri & Tiago Bonomo, 2018. "Returns to education, intergenerational mobility, and inequality trends in Brazil," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2018-129, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    9. Marcelo Neri & Tiago Bonomo, 2018. "Returns to education, intergenerational mobility, and inequality trends in Brazil," WIDER Working Paper Series 129, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inequality; Intergenerational Mobility; Equality of Opportunity; Transition Probabilities; Assortative Mating; Education; Human Capital; Latin America.;

    JEL classification:

    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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