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Gender in intergenerational educational persistence across time and place

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  • Alyssa Schneebaum

    ()

  • Bernhard Rumplmaier
  • Wilfried Altzinger

Abstract

Primarily using data from the 2010 European Social Survey, we analyze intergenerational educational persistence in 20 European countries, studying cross-country and cross-cluster differences; changes in the degree of intergenerational persistence over time; and the role of gender in determining educational persistence across generations. We find that persistence is highest in the Southern and Eastern European countries, and lowest in the Nordic countries. While persistence in the Nordic and Southern countries has declined over time, it has remained relatively steady in the rest of Europe. Our analysis highlights the importance of a detailed gender analysis in studying intergenerational persistence, finding that mothers’ education is a stronger determinant of daughters’ (instead of sons’) education and fathers’ education a stronger determinant of the education of their sons. For most clusters, declines in intergenerational persistence over time are largely driven by increasing mobility for younger women. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Alyssa Schneebaum & Bernhard Rumplmaier & Wilfried Altzinger, 2015. "Gender in intergenerational educational persistence across time and place," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 42(2), pages 413-445, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:empiri:v:42:y:2015:i:2:p:413-445
    DOI: 10.1007/s10663-015-9291-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Orhan Torul & Oguz Oztunali, 2017. "Intergenerational Educational Mobility in Europe," Working Papers 2017/03, Bogazici University, Department of Economics.
    2. Evangelia Papapetrou & Pinelopi Tsalaporta, 2017. "Is there a case for intergenerational transmission of female labour force participation and educational attainment? Evidence from Greece during the crisis," Working Papers 223, Bank of Greece.
    3. repec:bla:revinw:v:64:y:2018:i:2:p:295-331 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:wfo:wstudy:57887 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Alyssa Schneebaum & Miriam Rehm & Katharina Mader & Katarina Hollan, 2018. "The Gender Wealth Gap Across European Countries," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 64(2), pages 295-331, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Intergenerational persistence; Educational attainment ; Educational welfare states; Europe; Gender; J62; I24; I38; D63;

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement

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