IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/scotjp/v52y2005i4p544-564.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Ethnic And Gender Differences In Intergenerational Mobility: A Study Of 26‐Year‐Olds In The Usa

Author

Abstract

This paper uses the traditional income framework and a non‐monetary framework to estimate intergenerational mobility in economic status for a sample of 26‐year‐old whites, blacks and Hispanics in the USA using data from the first and fifth sweeps of the National Educational Longitudinal Study (1988 and 2000). Intergenerational income mobility is found to be greater for males than for females, although there are differences between whites, blacks and Hispanics. Transition probabilities indicate that Hispanics are the most upwardly mobile in terms of educational attainment and occupational status. Ordered logits are used to estimate the impact of parental education and occupation on educational and occupational outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Anh Nguyen & Getinet Haile & Jim Taylor, 2005. "Ethnic And Gender Differences In Intergenerational Mobility: A Study Of 26‐Year‐Olds In The Usa," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 52(4), pages 544-564, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:52:y:2005:i:4:p:544-564
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9485.2005.00355.x
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9485.2005.00355.x
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Miles Corak, 2001. "Are the Kids All Right? Intergenerational Mobility and Child Well-being in Canada," The Review of Economic Performance and Social Progress, in: Andrew Sharpe, Executive Director & France St-Hilaire, Vice-President , Research & Keith Banting, Di (ed.),The Review of Economic Performance and Social Progress 2001: The Longest Decade: Canada in the 1990s, volume 1, Centre for the Study of Living Standards;The Institutute for Research on Public Policy.
    2. Levine, D.I., 1999. "Choosing the Right Parents: Changes in the Intergenerational Transmission of Inequality Between the 1970s and the Early 1990s," Papers 72, California Berkeley - Institute of Industrial Relations.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Wilfried Altzinger & Jesús Crespo Cuaresma & Alyssa Schneebaum & Bernhard Rumplmaier & Petra Sauer, 2015. "Education and Social Mobility in Europe: Levelling the Playing Field for Europe's Children and Fuelling its Economy. WWWforEurope Working Paper No. 80," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 57887, August.
    2. Schneebaum, Alyssa & Rumplmaier, Bernhard & Altzinger, Wilfried, 2014. "Intergenerational Educational Persistence in Europe," Department of Economics Working Paper Series 174, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    3. Jason Fletcher & Joel Han, 2019. "Intergenerational Mobility in Education: Variation in Geography and Time," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(4), pages 585-634.
    4. Anna Christina D'Addio, 2007. "Intergenerational Transmission of Disadvantage: Mobility or Immobility Across Generations?," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 52, OECD Publishing.
    5. Haile, Getinet Astatike, 2016. "Intergenerational Mobility in Income and Economic Status in Ethiopia," IZA Discussion Papers 10047, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Alyssa Schneebaum & Bernhard Rumplmaier & Wilfried Altzinger, 2015. "Gender in intergenerational educational persistence across time and place," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 42(2), pages 413-445, May.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:52:y:2005:i:4:p:544-564. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/sesssea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.