IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ran/wpaper/wr-859.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Stereotypes and Madrassas Experimental Evidence from Pakistan

Author

Listed:
  • Adeline Delavande
  • Basit Zafar

Abstract

Madrassas (Islamic religious seminaries) have been alleged to be responsible for fostering Islamic extremism and violence, and for indoctrinating their students in narrow worldviews. However, very little is known about the behavior of Madrassa students, and how other groups in their communities interact with them. To investigate this, the authors use unique experimental and survey data that they collected in Madrassas and other educational institutions in Pakistan. They randomly match male students from institutions of three distinct religious tendencies and socioeconomic background — Madrassas, Islamic Universities, and Liberal Universities — and observe their actions in several experiments of economic decision-making. First, they find a high level of trust among all groups, with students enrolled at Madrassas being the most trusting and exhibiting the highest level of unconditional other-regarding behavior. Second, within each group, they fail to find evidence of in-group bias or systematic out-group bias either in trust or tastes. These findings cast doubt on the general perception that Madrassas teach hatred and narrow worldviews. Third, they find that students of Liberal Universities underestimate the trustworthiness of Madrassa students, suggesting that an important segment of the society has mistaken stereotypes about students in religious seminaries.

Suggested Citation

  • Adeline Delavande & Basit Zafar, 2011. "Stereotypes and Madrassas Experimental Evidence from Pakistan," Working Papers WR-859, RAND Corporation.
  • Handle: RePEc:ran:wpaper:wr-859
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/working_papers/2011/RAND_WR859.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Joseph Daniels & Marc von der Ruhr, 2010. "Trust in Others: Does Religion Matter?," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 68(2), pages 163-186.
    2. Stephen Knack & Philip Keefer, 1997. "Does Social Capital Have an Economic Payoff? A Cross-Country Investigation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1251-1288.
    3. Ruffle Bradley J. & Sosis Richard, 2007. "Does It Pay To Pray? Costly Ritual and Cooperation," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 1-37, March.
    4. Schechter, Laura, 2007. "Traditional trust measurement and the risk confound: An experiment in rural Paraguay," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 272-292, February.
    5. Karlan, Dean S., 2005. "Using Experimental Economics to Measure Social Capital and Predict Financial Decisions," Center Discussion Papers 28429, Yale University, Economic Growth Center.
    6. repec:pri:rpdevs:gamespaper.pdf is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Dean S. Karlan, 2005. "Using Experimental Economics to Measure Social Capital and Predict Financial Decisions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(5), pages 1688-1699, December.
    8. Andrabi, Tahir & Das, Jishnu & Khwaja, Asim Ijaz & Zajonc, Tristan, 2005. "Religious school enrollment in Pakistan : a look at the data," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3521, The World Bank.
    9. Vivian Lei & Filip Vesely, 2010. "In-Group versus Out-Group Trust: The Impact of Income Inequality," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 76(4), pages 1049-1063, April.
    10. James Andreoni & John Miller, 2002. "Giving According to GARP: An Experimental Test of the Consistency of Preferences for Altruism," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(2), pages 737-753, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bryan C. McCannon & Colleen Tokar Asaad & Mark Wilson, 2015. "Contracts and Trust," Working Papers 15-15, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ran:wpaper:wr-859. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Benson Wong). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/lpranus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.