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Decomposing trust and trustworthiness

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  • Nava Ashraf
  • Iris Bohnet
  • Nikita Piankov

Abstract

What motivates people to trust and be trustworthy? Is trust solely “calculative,” based on the expectation of trustworthiness, and trustworthiness only reciprocity? Employing a within-subject design, we run investment and dictator game experiments in Russia, South Africa and the United States. Additionally, we measured risk preferences and expectations of return. Expectations of return account for most of the variance in trust, but unconditional kindness also matters. Variance in trustworthiness is mainly accounted for by unconditional kindness, while reciprocity plays a comparatively small role. There exists some heterogeneity in motivation but people behave surprisingly similarly in the three countries studied. Copyright Economic Science Association 2006

Suggested Citation

  • Nava Ashraf & Iris Bohnet & Nikita Piankov, 2006. "Decomposing trust and trustworthiness," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 9(3), pages 193-208, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:expeco:v:9:y:2006:i:3:p:193-208
    DOI: 10.1007/s10683-006-9122-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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