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Gender differences in altruism on Mechanical Turk: Expectations and actual behaviour

Author

Listed:
  • Pablo Brañas-Garza

    (Loyola Andalucia University)

  • Valerio Capraro

    (Middlesex University)

  • Ericka Rascón Ramírez

    (Middlesex University)

Abstract

Whether or not there are gender differences in altruistic behavior in Dictator Game experiments has attracted considerable attention in recent years. Earlier studies found women to be more altruistic than men. However, this conclusion has been challenged by more recent accounts, which have argued that gender differences in altruistic behaviour may be a peculiarity of student samples and may not extend to random samples. Here we study gender differences in altruistic behavior and, additionally, in expectations of altruistic behaviour, in a sample of Amazon Mechanical Turk crowdworkers living in the US. In Study 1, we report a mega-analysis of more than 3,500 observations and we show that women are significantly more altruistic than men. In Study 2, we show that both women and men expect women to be more altruistic than men.

Suggested Citation

  • Pablo Brañas-Garza & Valerio Capraro & Ericka Rascón Ramírez, 2018. "Gender differences in altruism on Mechanical Turk: Expectations and actual behaviour," SEET Working Papers 2018-02, BELIS, Istanbul Bilgi University.
  • Handle: RePEc:beb:wpseet:201802
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    File URL: http://repeck.bilgi.edu.tr/RePEc/beb/wpseet/BelisWP_SEET06.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2018
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    1. repec:gam:jgames:v:9:y:2018:i:2:p:28-:d:148046 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:jdm:journl:v:13:y:2018:i:4:p:345-355 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Brañas-Garza, Pablo & Bucheli, Marisa & Espinosa, Maria Paz, 2018. "Altruism and information," MPRA Paper 87089, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • C99 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Other
    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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