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Does stake size matter in trust games?

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  • Johansson-Stenman, Olof
  • Mahmud, Minhaj
  • Martinsson, Peter

Abstract

In a trust game conducted in rural Bangladesh, the proportion of money sent decreased significantly with the stake size. Still, even with very large stakes few followed the conventional economic prediction and sent nothing.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Johansson-Stenman, Olof & Mahmud, Minhaj & Martinsson, Peter, 2005. "Does stake size matter in trust games?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 88(3), pages 365-369, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:88:y:2005:i:3:p:365-369
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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