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Search Complementarities, Aggregate Fluctuations, and Fiscal Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Jesus Fernandez-Villaverde

    (University of Pennsylvania, NBER, and CEPR)

  • Federico Mandelman

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta)

  • Yang Yu

    (Shanghai University of Finance and Economics)

  • Francesco Zanetti

    (University of Oxford)

Abstract

We develop a quantitative business cycle model with search complementarities in the inter-?rm matching process that entails a multiplicity of equilibria. An active static equilibrium with strong joint venture formation, large output, and low unemployment can coexist with a passive static equilibrium with low joint venture formation, low output, and high unemployment. Changes in fundamentals move the system between the two static equilibria, generating large and persistent business cycle ?uctuations. The volatility of shocks is important for the selection and duration of each static equilibrium. Su?ciently adverse shocks in periods of low macroeconomic volatility trigger severe and protracted downturns. The magnitude of government intervention is critical to foster economic recovery in the passive static equilibrium, while it plays a limited role in the active static equilibrium.

Suggested Citation

  • Jesus Fernandez-Villaverde & Federico Mandelman & Yang Yu & Francesco Zanetti, 2019. "Search Complementarities, Aggregate Fluctuations, and Fiscal Policy," PIER Working Paper Archive 19-016, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
  • Handle: RePEc:pen:papers:19-016
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hertweck, Matthias S. & Lewis, Vivien & Villa, Stefania, 2019. "Going the extra mile: Effort by workers and job-seekers," Discussion Papers 29/2019, Deutsche Bundesbank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Aggregate Auctuations; strategic complementarities; macroeconomic volatility; government spending;

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

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