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Making Summer Matter: The Impact of Youth Employment on Academic Performance

Author

Listed:
  • Amy Ellen Schwartz
  • Jacob Leos-Urbel
  • Joel McMurry
  • Matthew Wiswall

Abstract

This paper examines New York City’s Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP). SYEP provides jobs to youth ages 14-24, and due to high demand for summer jobs, allocates slots through a random lottery system. We match student-level data from the SYEP program with educational records from the NYC Department of Education and use the random lottery to estimate the effects of SYEP participation on a number of academic outcomes, including test taking and performance. We find that SYEP participation has positive impacts on student academic outcomes, and these effects are particularly large for students who participate in SYEP multiple times.

Suggested Citation

  • Amy Ellen Schwartz & Jacob Leos-Urbel & Joel McMurry & Matthew Wiswall, 2015. "Making Summer Matter: The Impact of Youth Employment on Academic Performance," NBER Working Papers 21470, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:21470
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alexander Gelber & Adam Isen & Judd B. Kessler, 2014. "The Effects of Youth Employment: Evidence from New York City Summer Youth Employment Program Lotteries," NBER Working Papers 20810, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Charlene Kalenkoski & Sabrina Pabilonia, 2009. "Does Working While in High School Reduce U.S. Study Time?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 93(1), pages 117-121, August.
    3. repec:mpr:mprres:7746 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. James Heckman, 2011. "Policies to foster human capital," Educational Studies, Higher School of Economics, issue 3, pages 73-137.
    5. Jeanne Bellotti & Linda Rosenberg & Samina Sattar & Andrea Mraz Esposito & Jessica Ziegler, "undated". "Reinvesting in America's Youth: Lessons from the 2009 Recovery Act Summer Youth Employment Initiative," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 650fe7340244438ab3c5bda6a, Mathematica Policy Research.
    6. Raj Chetty & John N. Friedman & Jonah E. Rockoff, 2014. "Measuring the Impacts of Teachers I: Evaluating Bias in Teacher Value-Added Estimates," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(9), pages 2593-2632, September.
    7. Raj Chetty & John N. Friedman & Jonah E. Rockoff, 2014. "Measuring the Impacts of Teachers II: Teacher Value-Added and Student Outcomes in Adulthood," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(9), pages 2633-2679, September.
    8. Schwartz, Amy Ellen & Stiefel, Leanna & Wiswall, Matthew, 2013. "Do small schools improve performance in large, urban districts? Causal evidence from New York City," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 27-40.
    9. repec:hrv:faseco:30749606 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Donna S. Rothstein, 2007. "High School Employment and Youths' Academic Achievement," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(1).
    11. Ruhm, Christopher J, 1997. "Is High School Employment Consumption or Investment?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(4), pages 735-776, October.
    12. repec:mpr:mprres:6536 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Sabia, Joseph J., 2009. "School-year employment and academic performance of young adolescents," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 268-276, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jonathan M.V. Davis & Sara B. Heller, 2017. "Rethinking the Benefits of Youth Employment Programs: The Heterogeneous Effects of Summer Jobs," NBER Working Papers 23443, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Paulsen, Richard J., 2019. "Reducing inequality summer by summer: Lessons from an evaluation of the Boston Summer Youth Employment Program," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 40-53.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy

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