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School-year employment and academic performance of young adolescents

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  • Sabia, Joseph J.

Abstract

Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, this study examines the relationship between school-year employment and academic performance of young adolescents under age 16. Ordinary least squares estimates show a significant positive relationship between modest hours of school-year employment and grade point average. However, the inclusion of individual fixed effects diminishes the relationship substantially, suggesting that much of the positive correlation can be explained by individual heterogeneity. This interpretation of results is supported by the absence of evidence that school-year work affects school engagement or future-orientedness, the usual mechanisms through which work is hypothesized to produce positive schooling spillovers.

Suggested Citation

  • Sabia, Joseph J., 2009. "School-year employment and academic performance of young adolescents," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 268-276, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:28:y:2009:i:2:p:268-276
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Amy Ellen Schwartz & Jacob Leos-Urbel & Matthew Wiswall, 2015. "Making Summer Matter: The Impact of Youth Employment on Academic Performance," NBER Working Papers 21470, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Charles L. Baum & Christopher J. Ruhm, 2016. "The Changing Benefits of Early Work Experience," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 343-363, October.
    3. Neyt, Brecht & Omey, Eddy & Verhaest, Dieter & Baert, Stijn, 2017. "Does Student Work Really Affect Educational Outcomes? A Review of the Literature," IZA Discussion Papers 11023, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Bachmann, Andreas & Boes, Stefan, 2014. "Private transfers and college students’ decision to work," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 34-42.
    5. Chuang, Yih-chyi & Lai, Wei-wen, 2010. "Heterogeneity, comparative advantage, and return to education: The case of Taiwan," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 804-812, October.
    6. Holford, Angus, 2015. "Youth employment and academic performance: production functions and policy effects," ISER Working Paper Series 2015-06, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    7. Buonomo Zabaleta, Mariela, 2011. "The impact of child labor on schooling outcomes in Nicaragua," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1527-1539.
    8. Rokicka, Magdalena, 2014. "The impact of students' part-time work on educational outcomes," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-42, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

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