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High School Employment, School Performance, and College Entry

Author

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  • Lee, Chanyoung
  • Orazem, Peter

Abstract

The proportion of U.S. high school students working during the school year ranges from 23% in the freshman year to 75% in the senior year. This study estimates how cumulative work histories during the high school years affect probability of dropout, high school academic performance, and the probability of attending college. Variation in individual date of birth and in state truancy laws along with the strength of local demand for low-skill labor are used as instruments for endogenous work hours during the high school career. Working more hours during the academic year does not affect high school academic performance. However, increased high school work intensity raises the likelihood of completing high school but lowers the probability of going to college. These results are similar for boys and girls, and so working during high school does not explain the widening gap in college entry between men and women.

Suggested Citation

  • Lee, Chanyoung & Orazem, Peter, 2008. "High School Employment, School Performance, and College Entry," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12953, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:12953
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    File URL: http://www2.econ.iastate.edu/papers/p5474-2008-06-18.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Stephen V. Cameron & Christopher Taber, 2004. "Estimation of Educational Borrowing Constraints Using Returns to Schooling," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(1), pages 132-182, February.
    2. Eckstein, Z. & Wolpin, K.I., 1997. "Youth Employment and Academic Perfomance in High School," Papers 24-97, Tel Aviv.
    3. John H. Tyler, 2003. "Using State Child Labor Laws to Identify the Effect of School-Year Work on High School Achievement," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(2), pages 353-380, April.
    4. Ralph Stinebrickner & Todd R. Stinebrickner, 2003. "Working during School and Academic Performance," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(2), pages 449-472, April.
    5. Stock, James H & Wright, Jonathan H & Yogo, Motohiro, 2002. "A Survey of Weak Instruments and Weak Identification in Generalized Method of Moments," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(4), pages 518-529, October.
    6. Donna S. Rothstein, 2007. "High School Employment and Youths' Academic Achievement," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(1).
    7. Joshua D. Angrist & Alan B. Keueger, 1991. "Does Compulsory School Attendance Affect Schooling and Earnings?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(4), pages 979-1014.
    8. Ruhm, Christopher J, 1997. "Is High School Employment Consumption or Investment?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(4), pages 735-776, October.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Amy Bergenwall & E. Kelloway & Julian Barling, 2014. "Odd Jobs, Bad Habits, and Ethical Implications: Smoking-Related Outcomes of Children’s Early Employment Intensity," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 122(2), pages 269-282, June.
    2. Joseph Sabia & Daniel Rees, 2015. "Body weight, mental health capital, and academic achievement," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 653-684, September.
    3. Bachmann, Andreas & Boes, Stefan, 2014. "Private transfers and college students’ decision to work," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 34-42.
    4. Huzeyfe Torun & Semih Tumen, 2017. "The empirical content of season-of-birth effects: An investigation with Turkish data," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 37(57), pages 1825-1860, December.
    5. Kasey S. Buckles & Daniel M. Hungerman, 2013. "Season of Birth and Later Outcomes: Old Questions, New Answers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(3), pages 711-724, July.
    6. repec:mts:jrnlee:v:16:y:2016:i:1:p:22-35 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Neyt, Brecht & Omey, Eddy & Verhaest, Dieter & Baert, Stijn, 2017. "Does Student Work Really Affect Educational Outcomes? A Review of the Literature," GLO Discussion Paper Series 121, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    8. repec:bla:obuest:v:79:y:2017:i:6:p:1087-1124 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Elliott Fan & Jin-Tan Liu & Yen-Chien Chen, 2014. "Is the 'Quarter of Birth' Endogenous? Evidence From One Million Siblings in Taiwan," NBER Working Papers 20444, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Alam, Moudud & Carling, Kenneth & Nääs, Ola, 2013. "The effect of summer jobs on post-schooling incomes," Working Paper Series 2013:24, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    11. Russell Ormiston, 2016. "Does High School Employment Develop Marketable Skills?," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 53-68, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    child labor; GPA; college enrollment; dropout; truancy age;

    JEL classification:

    • N30 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - General, International, or Comparative

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