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Distilling the Macroeconomic News Flow

  • Alessandro Beber
  • Michael W. Brandt
  • Maurizio Luisi

We propose a simple cross-sectional technique to extract daily factors from economic news released at different times and frequencies. Our approach can effectively handle the large number of different announcements that are relevant for tracking current economic conditions. We apply the technique to extract real-time measures of inflation, output, employment, and macroeconomic sentiment, as well as corresponding measures of disagreement among economists about these indices. We find that our procedure provides more timely and accurate forecasts of future changes in economic conditions than other real-time forecasting approaches.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 19650.

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Date of creation: Nov 2013
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19650
Note: AP
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  1. Aruoba, S. BoraÄŸan & Diebold, Francis X. & Scotti, Chiara, 2009. "Real-Time Measurement of Business Conditions," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 27(4), pages 417-427.
  2. Yacine Ait-Sahalia & Per A. Mykland, 2003. "How Often to Sample a Continuous-Time Process in the Presence of Market Microstructure Noise," NBER Working Papers 9611, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Schwert, G William, 1989. " Why Does Stock Market Volatility Change over Time?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 44(5), pages 1115-53, December.
  4. Whitney K. Newey & Kenneth D. West, 1986. "A Simple, Positive Semi-Definite, Heteroskedasticity and AutocorrelationConsistent Covariance Matrix," NBER Technical Working Papers 0055, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Andersen, Torben G. & Bollerslev, Tim & Diebold, Francis X. & Vega, Clara, 2002. "Micro Effects of Macro Announcements: Real-Time Price Discovery in Foreign Exchange," Working Papers 02-16, Duke University, Department of Economics.
  6. Liebermann, Joelle, 2010. "Real-time nowcasting of GDP: Factor model versus professional forecasters," MPRA Paper 28819, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Evan F. Koenig & Sheila Dolmas & Jeremy Piger, 2003. "The Use and Abuse of Real-Time Data in Economic Forecasting," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(3), pages 618-628, August.
  8. Martha Banbura & Domenico Giannone & Michèle Modugno & Lucrezia Reichlin, 2012. "Now-Casting and the Real-Time Data Flow," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2012-026, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  9. Robert F. Engle & Jose Gonzalo Rangel, 2008. "The Spline-GARCH Model for Low-Frequency Volatility and Its Global Macroeconomic Causes," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 21(3), pages 1187-1222, May.
  10. Domenico Giannone & Lucrezia Reichlin & David Small, 2008. "Nowcasting: the real time informational content of macroeconomic data releases," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/6409, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  11. Mark J. Flannery & Aris A. Protopapadakis, 2002. "Macroeconomic Factors Do Influence Aggregate Stock Returns," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 15(3), pages 751-782.
  12. Alessandro Beber & Michael W. Brandt & Kenneth A. Kavajecz, 2010. "What Does Equity Sector Orderflow Tell Us about the Economy?," NBER Working Papers 16534, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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