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Monetary Shocks and Central Bank Liquidity with Credit Market Imperfections

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  • Pierre-Richard Agénor
  • Koray Alper

Abstract

This paper analyzes the transmission process of monetary policy in a closed-economy New Keynesian model with monopolistic banking, credit market imperfections, and a cost channel. Lending rates incorporate a risk premium, which depends on firms' net worth and cyclical output. The supply of bank loans is perfectly elastic at the prevailing bank rate and so is the provision of central bank liquidity at the official policy rate. The model is calibrated for a middle-income country. Numerical simulations show that credit market imperfections and sluggish adjustment of bank deposit rates (rather than lending rates) may impart a substantial degree of persistence in the response of output and inflation to monetary shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Pierre-Richard Agénor & Koray Alper, 2009. "Monetary Shocks and Central Bank Liquidity with Credit Market Imperfections," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 120, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
  • Handle: RePEc:man:cgbcrp:120
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. R. P. Agenor & K. Alper & L. Pereira da Silva, 2013. "Capital Regulation, Monetary Policy, and Financial Stability," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 9(3), pages 198-243, September.
    2. Primus, Keyra, 2017. "Excess reserves, monetary policy and financial volatility," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 153-168.
    3. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Pereira da Silva, Luiz, 2017. "Cyclically adjusted provisions and financial stability," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 143-162.
    4. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Pereira da Silva, Luiz, 2017. "Cyclically adjusted provisions and financial stability," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 143-162.
    5. Pierre-Richard Agénor & Luiz A. Pereira da Silva, 2013. "Inflation Targeting and Financial Stability: A Perspective from the Developing World," Working Papers Series 324, Central Bank of Brazil, Research Department.
    6. Keyra Primus, 2013. "'Excess Reserves, Monetary Policy and Financial Volatility," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 183, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    7. Matthieu Darracq Pariès & Christoffer Kok Sørensen & Diego Rodriguez-Palenzuela, 2011. "Macroeconomic Propagation under Different Regulatory Regimes: Evidence from an Estimated DSGE Model for the Euro Area," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 7(4), pages 49-113, December.
    8. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Pereira da Silva, Luiz A., 2014. "Macroprudential regulation and the monetary transmission mechanism," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 13(C), pages 44-63.
    9. Agénor, P.-R. & Alper, K. & Pereira da Silva, L., 2012. "Capital requirements and business cycles with credit market imperfections," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 687-705.
    10. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Alper, Koray & Pereira da Silva, Luiz A., 2014. "Sudden floods, macroprudential regulation and stability in an open economy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(PA), pages 68-100.
    11. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Pereira da Silva, Luiz A., 2012. "Cyclical effects of bank capital requirements with imperfect credit markets," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 43-56.
    12. Pierre-Richard Agénor & K. Alper & L. Pereira da Silva, 2012. "Sudden Floods, Prudential Regulation and Stability in an Open Economy," Working Papers Series 267, Central Bank of Brazil, Research Department.
    13. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Zilberman, Roy, 2015. "Loan Loss Provisioning Rules, Procyclicality, and Financial Volatility," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 301-315.
    14. Primus, Keyra, 2013. "Excess Reserves, Monetary Policy and Financial Volatility," MPRA Paper 51670, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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