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Two Reasons Why Money and Credit May be Useful in Monetary Policy

Listed author(s):
  • Lawrence Christiano
  • Roberto Motto
  • Massimo Rostagno

We describe two examples which illustrate in different ways how money and credit may be useful in the conduct of monetary policy. Our first example shows how monitoring money and credit can help anchor private sector expectations about inflation. Our second example shows that a monetary policy that focuses too narrowly on inflation may inadvertently contribute to welfare-reducing boom-bust cycles in real and financial variables. The example is of some interest because it is based on a monetary policy rule fit to aggregate data. We show that a policy of monetary tightening when credit growth is strong can mitigate the problems identified in our second example.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w13502.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 13502.

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Date of creation: Oct 2007
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:13502
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