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Optimal Monetary Policy with Endogenous Capital Accumulation

Author

Listed:
  • David Lopez-Salido
  • Andrew T. Levin

Abstract

The previous literature on optimal monetary policy has focused mainly on dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models with a constant aggregate capital stock (cf. Woodford 1999; Erceg et al. 2000). In this paper, we analyze the monetary policy implications of endogenous capital accumulation. We augment the benchmark New Keynesian model to incorporate investment with quadratic adjustment costs, and use a perturbation algorithm to obtain the second-order approximation of the model around its steady state. Using these methods, we characterize the properties of the fully-optimal Ramsey policy under commitment, and compare the welfare implications of simple Taylor-style rules involving the inflation rate and the output gap. Simple rules in this class can be formulated in terms of two alternative definitions of potential output: the level that would prevail under flexible wages and prices, conditional on the current capital stock (as in Woodford 2003), or the level corresponding to a frictionless economy in which wages and prices had always been flexible (as in Nelson and Neiss 2003). Our analysis documents the relative performance of simple rules involving these definitions, and then considers the extent to which our findings are robust to various extensions of the baseline model, including variable capacity utilization, limited reallocation of capital across firms, and higher-order adjustment costs (as in Christiano, Eichenbaum and Evans 2001)

Suggested Citation

  • David Lopez-Salido & Andrew T. Levin, 2004. "Optimal Monetary Policy with Endogenous Capital Accumulation," 2004 Meeting Papers 826, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed004:826
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lawrence Christiano & Roberto Motto & Massimo Rostagno, 2007. "Two Reasons Why Money and Credit May be Useful in Monetary Policy," NBER Working Papers 13502, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Arnoud Stevens, 2015. "Optimal monetary policy response to endogenous oil price fluctuations," Working Paper Research 277, National Bank of Belgium.
    3. Andrew T. Levin & Alexei Onatski & John Williams & Noah M. Williams, 2006. "Monetary Policy Under Uncertainty in Micro-Founded Macroeconometric Models," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2005, Volume 20, pages 229-312 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Fabrice Collard & Harris Dellas & Behzad Diba & Olivier Loisel, 2017. "Optimal Monetary and Prudential Policies," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(1), pages 40-87, January.
    5. St?phane Auray & Aur?lien Eyquem, 2014. "Welfare Reversals in a Monetary Union," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 246-290, October.
    6. Teo, Wing Leong, 2011. "Inventories and optimal monetary policy in a small open economy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(8), pages 1719-1748.
    7. Martha R. López & Juan David Prada, 2010. "Optimal Monetary Policy And Asset Prices: The Case Of Colombia," ENSAYOS SOBRE POLÍTICA ECONÓMICA, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA - ESPE, vol. 28(61), pages 167-197, August.
    8. Christiano, Lawrence J. & Trabandt, Mathias & Walentin, Karl, 2011. "Introducing financial frictions and unemployment into a small open economy model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 1999-2041.
    9. Jean‐Marc Natal, 2012. "Monetary Policy Response to Oil Price Shocks," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 44(1), pages 53-101, February.
    10. Thomas A. Lubik & Wing Leong Teo, 2009. "Inventories and optimal monetary policy," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Fall, pages 357-382.
    11. Bodenstein, Martin & Guerrieri, Luca & LaBriola, Joe, 2014. "Macroeconomic Policy Games," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2014-87, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    12. Levin, Andrew T. & López-Salido, José David & Yun, Tack, 2007. "Strategic Complementarities and Optimal Monetary Policy," Kiel Working Papers 1355, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    13. Canzoneri, Matthew & Cumby, Robert & Diba, Behzad, 2016. "Optimal money and debt management: Liquidity provision vs tax smoothing," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 39-53.
    14. Clerc, Laurent & Dellas, Harris & Loisel, Olivier, 2011. "To be or not to be in monetary union: A synthesis," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 154-167, March.
    15. Hjortsoe, Ida, 2016. "Imbalances and fiscal policy in a monetary union," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 225-241.
    16. Levin, Andrew T., 2005. "Comment on: "Endogenous objectives and the evaluation of targeting rules for monetary policy"," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(5), pages 913-919, July.
    17. Stéphane Auray & Aurélien Eyquem, 2012. "Welfare Reversal in Monetary Union," Working Papers 2012-33, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Ramsey solution; policy under commitment; welfare analysis.;

    JEL classification:

    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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