IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The effects of monetary policy shocks in credit and labor markets with search and matching frictions

  • Giuseppe Ciccarone
  • Francesco Giuli
  • Danilo Liberati

By introducing search and matching frictions in both the labor and the credit markets into a cash in advance New Keynesian DSGE model, we provide a novel explanation of the incomplete pass-through from policy rates to loan rates. We show that this phenomenon is ineradicable if banks possess some power in the bargaining over the loan rate of interest, if the cost of posting job vacancies is positive and if firms and bank sustain costs when searching for lines of credit and when posting credit vacancies, respectively. We also show that the presence of credit market frictions moderates the reactions of output and wages to a monetary shock, and that the transmission of monetary policy shocks to output and inflation is more relevant than suggested by the recent literature.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.dipecodir.it/upload/wp/pdf/wp151.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics in its series Working Papers with number 151.

as
in new window

Length: 33
Date of creation: Jan 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:sap:wpaper:wp151
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Via Del Castro Laurenziano 9, 00161 Roma

Phone: +39 6 49766353
Fax: +39 6 4462040
Web page: http://www.dipecodir.it/

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Ravenna, Federico & Walsh, Carl E., 2008. "Vacancies, unemployment, and the Phillips curve," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(8), pages 1494-1521, November.
  2. Leonardo Gambacorta, 2004. "How Do Banks Set Interest Rates?," NBER Working Papers 10295, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Boris Hofmann, 2006. "EMU and the transmission of monetary policy: evidence from business lending rates," Empirica, Springer, vol. 33(4), pages 209-229, September.
  4. Chowdhury, Ibrahim & Hoffmann, Mathias & Schabert, Andreas, 2004. "Inflation dynamics and the cost channel of monetary transmission," CFR Working Papers 04-01, University of Cologne, Centre for Financial Research (CFR).
  5. Dixit, Avinash K & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1975. "Monopolistic Competition and Optimum Product Diversity," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 64, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  6. Robert E. Hall, 2009. "Reconciling Cyclical Movements in the Marginal Value of Time and the Marginal Product of Labor," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 117(2), pages 281-323, 04.
  7. Michiel Van Leuvensteijn & Christoffer Kok Sorensen & Jacob A. Bikker & Adrian A.R.J.M. Van Rixtel, 2011. "Impact of bank competition on the interest rate pass-through in the euro area," Post-Print hal-00763955, HAL.
  8. Giulio, NICOLETTI & Olivier, PIERRARD, 2006. "Capital Market Frictions and the Business Cycle," Discussion Papers (ECON - Département des Sciences Economiques) 2006053, Université catholique de Louvain, Département des Sciences Economiques.
  9. Nicolas Petrovsky-Nadeau & Etienne Wasmer, 2010. "The Cyclical Volatility of Labor Markets under Frictional Financial Markets," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/5l6uh8ogmqi, Sciences Po.
  10. Reint Gropp & Christoffer Kok & Jung-Duk Lichtenberger, 2014. "The Dynamics of Bank Spreads and Financial Structure," Quarterly Journal of Finance (QJF), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 4(04), pages 1450014-1-1.
  11. Hannan, Timothy H & Berger, Allen N, 1991. "The Rigidity of Prices: Evidence from the Banking Industry," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(4), pages 938-45, September.
  12. Chionis, Dionysios P. & Leon, Costas A., 2006. "Interest rate transmission in Greece: Did EMU cause a structural break?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 453-466, May.
  13. Mark Gertler & Luca Sala & Antonella Trigari, 2008. "An Estimated Monetary DSGE Model with Unemployment and Staggered Nominal Wage Bargaining," Working Papers 341, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  14. Ernst, Ekkehard & Semmler, Willi, 2010. "Global dynamics in a model with search and matching in labor and capital markets," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(9), pages 1651-1679, September.
  15. Kai Christoffel & James Costain & Gregory de Walque & Keith Kuester & Tobias Linzert & Stephen Millard & Olivier Pierrard, 2009. "Inflation dynamics with labour market matching: assessing alternative specifcations," BCL working papers 38, Central Bank of Luxembourg.
  16. Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1981. "Credit Rationing in Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 393-410, June.
  17. Hülsewig, Oliver & Mayer, Eric & Wollmershäuser, Timo, 2009. "Bank behavior, incomplete interest rate pass-through, and the cost channel of monetary policy transmission," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 1310-1327, November.
  18. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1982. "Interest rates and currency prices in a two-country world," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 335-359.
  19. de Bondt, Gabe & Mojon, Benoît & Valla, Natacha, 2005. "Term structure and the sluggishness of retail bank interest rates in euro area countries," Working Paper Series 0518, European Central Bank.
  20. Sander, Harald & Kleimeier, Stefanie, 2004. "Convergence in euro-zone retail banking? What interest rate pass-through tells us about monetary policy transmission, competition and integration," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 461-492, April.
  21. Christoffel, Kai & Kuester, Keith & Linzert, Tobias, 2009. "The role of labor markets for euro area monetary policy," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(8), pages 908-936, November.
  22. Paul Klemperer, 1987. "Markets with Consumer Switching Costs," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 102(2), pages 375-394.
  23. Egert, Balazs & Crespo-Cuaresma, Jesus & Reininger, Thomas, 2007. "Interest rate pass-through in central and Eastern Europe: Reborn from ashes merely to pass away?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 209-225.
  24. Johann Scharler, 2006. "Do Bank-Based Financial Systems Reduce Macroeconomic Volatility by Smoothing Interest Rates?," Working Papers 117, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank).
  25. Teruyoshi Kobayashi, 2008. "Incomplete Interest Rate Pass-Through and Optimal Monetary Policy," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 4(3), pages 77-118, September.
  26. Etienne Wasmer & Philippe Weil, 2004. "The Macroeconomics of Labor and Credit Market Imperfections," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 944-963, September.
  27. Kaufmann, Sylvia & Scharler, Johann, 2009. "Financial systems and the cost channel transmission of monetary policy shocks," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 40-46, January.
  28. Christoffel, Kai & Kuester, Keith & Linzert, Tobias, 2009. "The role of labor markets for euro area monetary policy," Kiel Working Papers 1513, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  29. Fourcans, Andre & Vranceanu, Radu, 2007. "The ECB monetary policy: Choices and challenges," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 181-194.
  30. Mojon, Benoît, 2000. "Financial structure and the interest rate channel of ECB monetary policy," Working Paper Series 0040, European Central Bank.
  31. Calvo, Guillermo A., 1983. "Staggered prices in a utility-maximizing framework," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 383-398, September.
  32. Ravenna, Federico & Walsh, Carl E., 2006. "Optimal monetary policy with the cost channel," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 199-216, March.
  33. de Bondt, Gabe, 2002. "Retail bank interest rate pass-through: new evidence at the euro area level," Working Paper Series 0136, European Central Bank.
  34. Ignazio Angeloni & Michael Ehrmann, 2003. "Monetary transmission in the euro area: early evidence," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 18(37), pages 469-501, October.
  35. Marcus Hagedorn & Iourii Manovskii, 2008. "The Cyclical Behavior of Equilibrium Unemployment and Vacancies Revisited," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1692-1706, September.
  36. Cooley, Thomas F. & Quadrini, Vincenzo, 1999. "A neoclassical model of the Phillips curve relation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 165-193, October.
  37. Karagiannis, Stelios & Panagopoulos, Yannis & Vlamis, Prodromos, 2010. "Interest rate pass-through in Europe and the US: Monetary policy after the financial crisis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 323-338, May.
  38. Kok, Christoffer & Werner, Thomas, 2006. "Bank interest rate pass-through in the euro area: a cross country comparison," Working Paper Series 0580, European Central Bank.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sap:wpaper:wp151. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Luisa Giuriato)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.