IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this paper

Internal Labour Market Mobility in 2005-2011: The Case of Latvia

Listed author(s):
  • Ieva Brauksa

    (Bank of Latvia)

  • Ludmila Fadejeva

    (Bank of Latvia)

This research gives an overview of labour market internal and occupational mobility in Latvia comparing periods before, during and after the crisis. It uses both the labour flow analysis and the survival analysis to evaluate labour mobility and to determine factors influencing it. The analysis is based on labour force survey (LFS) longitudinal data for 2005–2011. The paper investigates possible asymmetric responses of the labour market during the extreme period of economic boom and bust, provides detailed information on the aspects of labour market mobility (e.g. changes in the types of labour contract, sector and region of work) and factors determining changes in the status of economic activity (employed or unemployed). We also propose a new way for calculating labour market flows to provide information on quarterly changes.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: https://www.bank.lv/images/stories/pielikumi/publikacijas/petijumi/Brauksa_Fadejeva_Labour_mobility_in_Latvia.pdf
Download Restriction: no

File URL: https://www.macroeconomics.lv/sites/default/files/wp_2-2013-brauksa_fadejeva_labour_mobility_in_latvia.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Latvijas Banka in its series Working Papers with number 2013/02.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 03 Aug 2013
Handle: RePEc:ltv:wpaper:201302
Contact details of provider: Postal:
K. Valdemara iela 2a, LV-1050 Riga

Phone: +371 702 2300
Fax: +371 702 2420
Web page: https://www.bank.lv/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as
in new window

  1. Haltiwanger, John C. & Vodopivec, Milan, 1999. "Gross worker and job flows in a transition economy : an analysis of Estonia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2082, The World Bank.
  2. Mihails Hazans, 2003. "Determinants of Inter-Regional Migration in the Baltic Countries," ERSA conference papers ersa03p354, European Regional Science Association.
  3. Vladislav Flek & Martina Mysíková, 2015. "Uneployment Dynamics in Central Europe: A Labour Flow Approach," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2015(1), pages 73-87.
  4. Hazans, Mihails, 2005. "Unemployment and the earnings structure in Latvia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3504, The World Bank.
  5. Mihails Hazans, 2004. "Does Commuting Reduce Wage Disparities?," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(3), pages 360-390.
  6. Concha Artola & Una-Louise Bell, 1999. "Identifying Labour Market Dynamics using Labour Force Survey Data," Working Papers 9922, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
  7. Konstantīns Beņkovskis, 2012. "Competitiveness of Latvia's exporters," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 12(2), pages 17-45, December.
  8. Jaanika Meriküll, 2011. "Labour market mobility during a recession : the case of Estonia," Bank of Estonia Working Papers wp2011-01, Bank of Estonia, revised 22 Feb 2011.
  9. Kuhlenkasper, Torben & Steinhardt, Max Friedrich, 2011. "Unemployment duration in Germany: A comprehensive study with dynamic hazard models and P-Splines," HWWI Research Papers 111, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
  10. Michael W. L. Elsby & Jennifer C. Smith & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2011. "The role of worker flows in the dynamics and distribution of UK unemployment," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(2), pages 338-363.
  11. Anna Zasova & Aleksejs Melihovs, 2005. "Assessment of Labour Market Elasticity in Latvia," Working Papers 2005/03, Latvijas Banka.
  12. Alexandre Janiak, 2008. "Mobility in Europe - Why it is low, the bottlenecks, and the policy solutions," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 340, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
  13. Dr Tatiana Fic & Ana Rincon-Aznar & Lucy Stokes & Dawn Holland, 2011. "Labour mobility within the EU," NIESR Discussion Papers 379, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  14. Hazans, Mihails & Philips, Kaia, 2011. "The Post-Enlargement Migration Experience in the Baltic Labor Markets," IZA Discussion Papers 5878, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  15. José María Casado & Cristina Fernández-Vidaurreta & Juan F. Jimeno, 2012. "Labour flows in the EU at the beginning of the crisis," Economic Bulletin, Banco de España;Economic Bulletin Homepage, issue JAN, January.
  16. Jamie Jenkins & Mark Chandler, 2010. "Labour market gross flows data from the Labour Force Survey," Economic & Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan;Office for National Statistics, vol. 4(2), pages 25-30, February.
  17. repec:nsr:niesrd:379 is not listed on IDEAS
  18. Blanchard, Olivier Jean & Diamond, Peter, 1992. "The Flow Approach to Labor Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 354-359, May.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ltv:wpaper:201302. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Konstantins Benkovskis)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.