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When the Cat Is Near, the Mice Won't Play: The Effect of External Examiners in Italian Schools

Author

Listed:
  • Bertoni, Marco

    () (University of Padova)

  • Brunello, Giorgio

    () (University of Padova)

  • Rocco, Lorenzo

    () (University of Padova)

Abstract

We use a natural experiment to show that the presence of an external examiner in standardized school tests reduces the proportion of correct answers in monitored classes by 5.5 to 8.5% – depending on the grade and the test – with respect to classes in schools with no external monitor. We find that the effect of external monitoring in a class spills over to other classes in the same school. We argue that the negative effect of external supervision is due to reduced cheating (by students and/or teachers) rather than to distraction from having a stranger in the class.

Suggested Citation

  • Bertoni, Marco & Brunello, Giorgio & Rocco, Lorenzo, 2012. "When the Cat Is Near, the Mice Won't Play: The Effect of External Examiners in Italian Schools," IZA Discussion Papers 6629, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6629
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; external monitoring; testing;

    JEL classification:

    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education

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