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Spillover Effects in Healthcare Programs: Evidence on Social Norms and Information Sharing

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  • Avitabile, Ciro

Abstract

Although cervical cancer is considered one of the most preventable types of cancer, mortality rates in many developing countries are extremely high. This paper exploits the randomized research design of a large welfare program "PROGRESA" to study the existence of spillover effects in cervical cancer screening in rural Mexico. I find significant evidence of increased demand for Papanicolaou cervical cancer screening among women ineligible for the transfer, yet no evidence of similar externalities in non-gender specific tests, such as blood pressure and blood sugar checks. Different pieces of evidence from the evaluation sample and the nationwide rollout are consistent with the hypothesis that the PROGRESA program has weakened the social norm related to husbands' opposition to screening of their wives by male doctors. I find less evidence to support the hypothesis that the spillover effect is driven by higher levels of health information.

Suggested Citation

  • Avitabile, Ciro, 2013. "Spillover Effects in Healthcare Programs: Evidence on Social Norms and Information Sharing," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 4201, Inter-American Development Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:brikps:4201
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    Cited by:

    1. Manuela Angelucci & Vincenzo Di Maro, 2010. "Program Evaluation and Spillover Effects," SPD Working Papers 1003, Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Strategic Planning and Development Effectiveness (SPD).
    2. Olivia D'Aoust & Olivier Sterck & Philip Verwimp, 2013. "Buying Peace: The Mirage of Demobilizing Rebels," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2013-22, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    3. Bobonis, Gustavo J. & Castro, Roberto & Morales, Juan S., 2015. "Conditional Cash Transfers for Women and Spousal Violence: Evidence of the Long-Term Relationship from the Oportunidades Program in Rural Mexico," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 7267, Inter-American Development Bank.
    4. List, John & Momeni, Fatemeh & Zenou, Yves, 2019. "Are Estimates of Early Education Programs Too Pessimistic? Evidence from a Large-Scale Field Experiment that Causally Measures Neighbor Effects," CEPR Discussion Papers 13725, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Independent Evaluation Group, 2014. "Social Safety Nets and Gender : Learning from Impact Evaluations and World Bank Projects," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 21365.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    PROGRESA; cancer screening; health information;

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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