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Program evaluation and spillover effects

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  • Angelucci,M.
  • Di Maro,Vincenzo

Abstract

This paper is a practical guide for researchers and practitioners who want to understand spillover effects in program evaluation. The paper defines spillover effects and discusses why it is important to measure them. It explains how to design a field experiment to measure the average effects of the treatment on eligible and ineligible subjects for the program in the presence of spillover effects. In addition, the paper discusses the use of nonexperimental methods for estimating spillover effects when the experimental design is not a viable option. Evaluations that account for spillover effects should be designed such that they explain the cause of these effects and whom they affect. Such an evaluation design is necessary to avoid inappropriate policy recommendations and neglecting important mechanisms through which the program operates.

Suggested Citation

  • Angelucci,M. & Di Maro,Vincenzo, 2015. "Program evaluation and spillover effects," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7243, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7243
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Manuela Angelucci & Silvia Prina & Heather Royer & Anya Samek, 2015. "When Incentives Backfire: Spillover Effects in Food Choice," Framed Field Experiments 00444, The Field Experiments Website.
    2. repec:bla:agecon:v:48:y:2017:i:3:p:317-326 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Manan Roy & Daniel Millimet & Rusty Tchernis, 2012. "Federal nutrition programs and childhood obesity: inside the black box," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 1-38, March.
    4. Giuliani, Elisa & Maffioli, Alessandro & Pacheco, Manuel & Pietrobelli, Carlo & Stucchi, Rodolfo, 2014. "Evaluating the Impact of Cluster Development Programs," Papers in Innovation Studies 2014/10, Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation, Research and Competences in the Learning Economy.
    5. Castro, Marcelo Araújo & Mattos, Enlinson & Regatieri, Rebeca, 2015. "Fiscal interactions and spillover effects of a federal grant to Brazilian municipalities," Textos para discussão 388, FGV/EESP - Escola de Economia de São Paulo, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
    6. Schmidt, Emily & Tadesse, Fanaye, 2017. "The sustainable land management program in the Ethiopian highlands: An evaluation of its impact on crop production:," ESSP working papers 103, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Victoria Castillo & Lucas Figal Garone & Alessandro Maffioli & Lina Salazar, 2015. "Tourism Policy, a Big Push to Employment: Evidence from a Multiple Synthetic Control Approach," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 87973, Inter-American Development Bank.
    8. Ibanez, Marcela & Blackman, Allen, 2016. "Is Eco-Certification a Win–Win for Developing Country Agriculture? Organic Coffee Certification in Colombia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 14-27.
    9. Gustavo A. Crespi & Alessandro Maffioli & Pierre Mohnen & Gonzalo Vázquez, 2011. "Evaluating the Impact of Science, Technology and Innovation Programs: a Methodological Toolkit," SPD Working Papers 1104, Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Strategic Planning and Development Effectiveness (SPD).
    10. Beliyou Haile & Carlo Azzarri & Cleo Roberts & David J. Spielman, 2017. "Targeting, bias, and expected impact of complex innovations on developing-country agriculture: evidence from Malawi," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 48(3), pages 317-326, May.
    11. Martin Persson, U. & Alpízar, Francisco, 2013. "Conditional Cash Transfers and Payments for Environmental Services—A Conceptual Framework for Explaining and Judging Differences in Outcomes," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 124-137.
    12. Arthur Alik-Lagrange & Martin Ravallion, 2016. "Social Frictions to Knowledge Diffusion: Evidence from an Information Intervention," NBER Working Papers 21877, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Pascaline Dupas & Edward Miguel, 2016. "Impacts and Determinants of Health Levels in Low-Income Countries," NBER Working Papers 22235, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Miguel Ángel Borrella Mas & Mariano Bosch Mossi & Marcello Sartarelli, 2016. "Non-Contributory Pensions Number-Gender Effects on Poverty and Household Decisions," Working Papers. Serie AD 2016-02, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Disease Control&Prevention; Science Education; Labor Policies; Scientific Research&Science Parks; Population Policies;

    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access
    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities

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