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Children, Kitchen, Church: Does Ethnicity Matter?

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  • Anzelika Zaiceva
  • Klaus F. Zimmermann

Abstract

Gender role attitudes are well-known determinants of female labor supply. This paper examines the strength of those attitudes using time diaries on childcare, food management and religious activities provided by the British Time Use Survey. Given the low labor force participation of females from ethnic minorities, the role of ethnicity in forming those attitudes and influencing time spent for "traditional" female activities is of particular interest. The paper finds that white females in the UK have a higher probability to participate in the labor force than non-white females. Non-white females spend more time for religious activities and, to some extent, for food management than white females, while there are no ethnic differences for time spent on childcare. The ethnicity effect is also heterogenous across different socio-economic groups. Hence, cultural differences across ethnicities are significant, and do affect work behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Anzelika Zaiceva & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2007. "Children, Kitchen, Church: Does Ethnicity Matter?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 727, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp727
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    Cited by:

    1. Bettin, Giulia & Lucchetti, Riccardo & Zazzaro, Alberto, 2012. "Endogeneity and sample selection in a model for remittances," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(2), pages 370-384.
    2. César Vladimir Martínez Arango & Coralia Azucena Quintero Rojas & Lari Arthur Viianto, 2015. "Discriminación de género en redes laborales," Ensayos Revista de Economia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Economia, vol. 0(2), pages 1-34, November.
    3. Andreas Georgiadis & Alan Manning, 2011. "Change and continuity among minority communities in Britain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(2), pages 541-568, April.
    4. Anzelika Zaiceva & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2010. "Do Ethnic Minorities "Stretch" Their Time?: Evidence from the UK Time Use Survey," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 999, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    5. Daniel Hamermesh & Stephen Trejo, 2013. "How do immigrants spend their time? The process of assimilation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 507-530, April.
    6. repec:kap:reveho:v:15:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11150-015-9282-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Anzelika Zaiceva & Klaus Zimmermann, 2011. "Do ethnic minorities “stretch” their time? UK household evidence on multitasking," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 181-206, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Time use; ethnic minorities; gender; UK;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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