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Intra-household Allocation of Time to Household Production Activities: Evidence from Swedish Household Data


  • Sven-Olov Daunfeldt
  • Jörgen Hellström


The purpose of this paper is to study the intra-household allocation of time to different household production activities using Swedish cross-sectional household data. The Tobit model is rejected in favor of the Cragg model, suggesting that an empirical model has to take into consideration that allocation of time within the household is determined by two separate processes. Moreover, the results indicate that valuable information concerning the intra-household allocation of time may be missing when household production is defined as the sum of different household activities, but there is no indication that statistically significant effects are wiped out in an aggregated analysis. Copyright 2007 The Authors; Journal compilation 2007 CEIS, Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishing Ltd..

Suggested Citation

  • Sven-Olov Daunfeldt & Jörgen Hellström, 2007. "Intra-household Allocation of Time to Household Production Activities: Evidence from Swedish Household Data," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 21(2), pages 189-207, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:21:y:2007:i:2:p:189-207

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    Cited by:

    1. Richard Mussa, 2013. "Rural--urban differences in parental spending on children's primary education in Malawi," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(6), pages 789-811, December.
    2. Schwierz, Christoph, 2003. "The Effects of Taxes and Socioeconomic Variables on Market Work and Home Production in Norway in the Years 1970 to 2000," Memorandum 33/2003, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    3. Anzelika Zaiceva & Klaus Zimmermann, 2014. "Children, Kitchen, Church: does ethnicity matter?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 83-103, March.
    4. Stewart, Jay, 2013. "Tobit or not Tobit?," Journal of Economic and Social Measurement, IOS Press, issue 3, pages 263-290.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C24 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models; Threshold Regression Models
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply


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