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On the road to integration? Immigrant’s demand for informal (& formal) education

Author

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  • Coniglio, Nicola D.
  • Hoxhaj, Rezart
  • Jayet, Hubert

Abstract

In this paper we study the allocation of time devoted to informal learning and education, i.e. those activities carried out during leisure time and outside formal education courses which boost individuals’ human and social capital. For immigrants the private investment in these activities is likely to have relevant external effects as informal learning and education enhances the likelihood of greater socio-economic integration in the host society. We first develop a simple theoretical framework, which allows us to highlight the different constrains/opportunity costs faced by immigrants as compared with natives. Then, we empirically investigate the determinants of participation in informal education using the American Time Use Data (ATUS; period 2003-2015) which contains detailed information on daily time budgets of a large sample of immigrants and natives in the US. Consistently with a theoretical model of time allocation we find evidence that immigrants are more likely to engage in informal education and, conditionally on participation, they allocate more time to these activities. Over time, immigrants show a higher degree of assimilation into the host society. Our results also highlight heterogeneous patterns across gender.

Suggested Citation

  • Coniglio, Nicola D. & Hoxhaj, Rezart & Jayet, Hubert, 2019. "On the road to integration? Immigrant’s demand for informal (& formal) education," GLO Discussion Paper Series 389, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:389
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daniel Hamermesh & Stephen Trejo, 2013. "How do immigrants spend their time? The process of assimilation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 507-530, April.
    2. Cragg, John G, 1971. "Some Statistical Models for Limited Dependent Variables with Application to the Demand for Durable Goods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 39(5), pages 829-844, September.
    3. Fahr, Rene, 2005. "Loafing or learning?--the demand for informal education," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 75-98, January.
    4. Garry F. Barrett & Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2019. "Labor Supply Elasticities: Overcoming Nonclassical Measurement Error Using More Accurate Hours Data," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 54(1), pages 255-265.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    immigrants; time use; education; human capital;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General

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