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How Many Hours Do You Have to Work to Be Integrated? Full Time and Part Time Employment of Native and Ethnic Minority Women in the Netherlands

Author

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  • Bevelander, Pieter

    () (Malmö University)

  • Groeneveld, Sandra

    () (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

Abstract

Labor market participation is a central factor in the economic integration of migrants in their host country. Labor market integration of ethnic minority women is of special interest, as they may experience a double disadvantage: both as a woman and as a migrant. Since the late nineties this presumed double disadvantage has become more and more the focus of both Dutch integration and Dutch emancipation policy. To test several assumptions underlying Dutch policy this paper focuses on the employment patterns of ethnic minority and native women in the Netherlands. In particular, we analyze to what extent labor market participation of different groups of women and the hours they work are influenced by human capital and household characteristics. Our results show some remarkable differences in employment patterns between native Dutch and ethnic minority women. Controlling for educational level, partnership and the presence of children, native Dutch women are working more often in part time jobs than Mediterranean and Caribbean women. For all women the educational level is an important determinant of employment and the number of hours worked. Whereas the number of children influences both the employment decision and the number of hours worked of native Dutch women, for Mediterranean and Caribbean women there is only an effect of the number of children on the odds of having a full time job.

Suggested Citation

  • Bevelander, Pieter & Groeneveld, Sandra, 2007. "How Many Hours Do You Have to Work to Be Integrated? Full Time and Part Time Employment of Native and Ethnic Minority Women in the Netherlands," IZA Discussion Papers 2684, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp2684
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nekby, Lena, 2002. "Employment Convergence of Immigrants and Natives in Sweden," Research Papers in Economics 2002:9, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
    2. Long, James E, 1980. "The Effect of Americanization on Earnings: Some Evidence for Women," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(3), pages 620-629, June.
    3. Euwals, Rob & Hogerbrugge, Maurice, 2004. "Explaining the Growth of Part-Time Employment: Factors of Supply and Demand," IZA Discussion Papers 1124, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Gunnar Andersson & Kirk Scott, 2004. "Labour-market attachment and entry into parenthood: The experience of immigrant women in Sweden," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2004-011, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zaiceva, Anzelika, 2010. "East-West migration and gender: Is there a differential effect for migrant women?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 443-454, April.
    2. Bonin, Holger & Eichhorst, Werner & Florman, Christer & Hansen, Mette Okkels & Skiöld, Lena & Stuhler, Jan & Tatsiramos, Konstantinos & Thomasen, Henrik & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2008. "Report No. 19: Geographic Mobility in the European Union: Optimising its Economic and Social Benefits," IZA Research Reports 19, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Anzelika Zaiceva & Klaus Zimmermann, 2014. "Children, Kitchen, Church: does ethnicity matter?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 83-103, March.
    4. Antonio Accetturo & Luigi Infante, 2013. "Skills or culture? An analysis of the decision to work by immigrant women in Italy," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-21, December.
    5. Eleonora Mussino & Ann-Zofie Duvander, 2016. "Use It or Save It? Migration Background and Parental Leave Uptake in Sweden," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 32(2), pages 189-210, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    employment integration; hours worked; ethnic minority women;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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