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Labour-market attachment and entry into parenthood: The experience of immigrant women in Sweden

Author

Listed:
  • Gunnar Andersson

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Kirk Scott

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

Abstract

This paper investigates the impact of labour-market attachment on entry into motherhood for foreign-born women in Sweden. The study uses a longitudinal, register-based data set consisting of the entire population of immigrants from ten nations and a five-percent random sample of natives. The effects of earned income are evident, with increased income levels increasing the probability of becoming a mother for all observed nationalities. The effects of various states of participation and non-participation in the labour force do not vary greatly between immigrants and Swedish-born. Among all subgroups, we find a higher propensity to begin childbearing among those who are established in the labour market. Contrary to popular belief welfare recipience clearly reduces the first-birth intensity for immigrants but not for natives. The similarity in patterns across widely different national groups supports the notion that various institutional factors affecting all subgroups are crucial in influencing childbearing behaviour.

Suggested Citation

  • Gunnar Andersson & Kirk Scott, 2004. "Labour-market attachment and entry into parenthood: The experience of immigrant women in Sweden," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2004-011, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2004-011
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    File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2004-011.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gunnar Andersson, 2003. "Demographic trends in Sweden: an update of childbearing and nuptiality through 2002," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-034, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Rosholm, Michael & Scott, Kirk & Husted, Leif, 2000. "The Times They Are A-Changin' Organizational Change and Immigrant Employment Opportunities in Scandinavia," CLS Working Papers 00-7, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Centre for Labour Market and Social Research.
    3. FFF1Johan NNN1Surkyn & FFF2Ron NNN2Lesthaeghe, 2004. "Value Orientations and the Second Demographic Transition (SDT) in Northern, Western and Southern Europe: An Update," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 3(3), pages 45-86, April.
    4. Pieter Bevelander & Helena Skyt Nielsen, 2001. "Declining employment success of immigrant males in Sweden: Observed or unobserved characteristics?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 14(3), pages 455-471.
    5. Macunovich, D.J., 1996. "Relative Income and Price of Time: Exploring their effcts on U.S. Fertility and Female Labor Force Participation, 1963-1993," Department of Economics Working Papers 174, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    6. Macunovich, Diane J., 1998. "Race and relative income/price of time effects on U.S. fertility," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 365-400.
    7. Michaela Kreyenfeld, 2004. "Fertility decisions in the FRG and GDR," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2004-008, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    8. Gunnar Andersson & Boris Sobolev, 2001. "Small effects of selective migration and selective survival in retrospective studies of fertility," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-031, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bevelander, Pieter & Groeneveld, Sandra, 2007. "How Many Hours Do You Have to Work to Be Integrated? Full Time and Part Time Employment of Native and Ethnic Minority Women in the Netherlands," IZA Discussion Papers 2684, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. FFF1Caroline H. NNN1Bledsoe, 2004. "Reproduction at the Margins: Migration and Legitimacy in the New Europe," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 3(4), pages 87-116, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sweden; fertility;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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