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Are Muslim Immigrants Different in Terms of Cultural Integration?

Listed author(s):
  • Alberto Bisin

    (New York University - New York University [New York])

  • Eleonora Patacchini

    (Università degli Studi di Roma "La Sapienza" [Rome])

  • Thierry Verdier

    (PSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - École des Ponts ParisTech (ENPC), PSE - Paris School of Economics)

  • Yves Zenou

    (The Research Institute of Industrial Economics - The Research Institute of Industrial Economics)

Using the UK Fourth National Survey of Ethnic Minorities, we document differences in integration patterns between Muslims and non-Muslims. We find that Muslims integrate less and more slowly than non-Muslims. In terms of estimated probability of having a strong religious identity, a Muslim born in the UK and having spent there more than 30 years is comparable with a non-Muslim just arrived in the country. Moreover, higher levels of income as well as higher on-the-job qualifications seem to be associated with a stronger religious identity for Muslim immigrants only. Finally, we find no evidence that segregated neighborhoods breed intense religious and cultural identities for ethnic minorities, in general, and, in particular, for Muslims.

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Paper provided by HAL in its series Post-Print with number halshs-00754289.

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Date of creation: May 2008
Publication status: Published in Journal of the European Economic Association, Wiley, 2008, 6 (2-3), pp.445-456. <10.1162/JEEA.2008.6.2-3.445>
Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00754289
DOI: 10.1162/JEEA.2008.6.2-3.445
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal-pjse.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00754289
Contact details of provider: Web page: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/

References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Constant, Amelie F. & Gataullina, Liliya & Zimmermann, Klaus F. & Zimmermann, Laura V, 2006. "Clash of Cultures: Muslims and Christians in the Ethnosizing Process," IZA Discussion Papers 2350, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Roland G. Fryer, Jr. & Paul Torelli, 2005. "An Empirical Analysis of 'Acting White'," NBER Working Papers 11334, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Alberto Bisin & Giorgio Topa & Thierry Verdier, 2004. "Religious Intermarriage and Socialization in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(3), pages 615-664, June.
  4. Alan Manning & Sanchari Roy, 2007. "Culture Clash or Culture Club? The Identity and Attitudes of Immigrants in Britain," CEP Discussion Papers dp0790, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
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