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The Effects of Globalization on Worker Training

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  • Gersbach, Hans
  • Schmutzler, Armin

Abstract

We examine how globalization affects firms’ incentives to provide general worker training. We consider a three-stage game. In stage 1, firms invest in productivity-enhancing training. In stage 2, they can make wage offers for each others’ workers. Finally, Cournot competition takes place. When two product markets become integrated, that is, replaced by a market with greater demand and more firms, training by each firm increases, provided the two markets are sufficiently small. When barriers between large markets are eliminated, training is reduced. Integration increases welfare if it does not reduce training. However, for large parameter regions, welfare falls if integration reduces training. We also show that opening markets to countries with publicly funded training or cheap, low-skilled labour can threaten apprenticeship systems.

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  • Gersbach, Hans & Schmutzler, Armin, 2005. "The Effects of Globalization on Worker Training," CEPR Discussion Papers 4879, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:4879
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    Cited by:

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    3. Moniz, António & Paulos, Margarida Ramires, 2008. "The globalisation in the clothing sector and its implications for work organisation: a view from the Portuguese case," MPRA Paper 10165, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. António B. Moniz & Margarida R. Paulos, 2009. "The clothing industry as a globalized sector: implications for work organisation, quality of work and job content," IET Working Papers Series 13/2009, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, IET/CICS.NOVA-Interdisciplinary Centre on Social Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology.
    5. Samuel Muehlemann, 2013. "Der Einfluss der Internationalisierung auf die arbeitsmarktorientierte Bildung," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0092, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    general worker training; globalization; human capital; oligopoly; turnover;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D42 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Monopoly
    • L22 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Organization and Market Structure
    • L43 - Industrial Organization - - Antitrust Issues and Policies - - - Legal Monopolies and Regulation or Deregulation
    • L92 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Railroads and Other Surface Transportation

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