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Firms' Investments in General Training and the Market for Skilled Labour

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  • Anette Boom

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Abstract

An adverse selection model is analysed where firms can either train or hire a skilled worker. In equilibrium the market wage is determined by supply and demand. The quality of the supply of skilled labour is negatively biased because workers stem either from firms that shut down or from firms that observed their trainee's bad quality during the training. If less firms shut down this quality deteriorates and the incentive to train increases. The incentive is inefficient, because firms must share the informational rent and because they free-ride. Ex ante workers may wish to increase the firms' bargaining power

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  • Anette Boom, "undated". "Firms' Investments in General Training and the Market for Skilled Labour," Papers 013, Departmental Working Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:bef:lsbest:013
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Anke S. Kessler & Christoph Lülfesmann, 2006. "The Theory of Human Capital Revisited: on the Interaction of General and Specific Investments," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(514), pages 903-923, October.
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    3. Daron Acemoglu & Steve Pischke, 1999. "Minimum Wages and On-the-Job Training," Working papers 99-25, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
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    6. Daron Acemoglu & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 1999. "The Structure of Wages and Investment in General Training," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(3), pages 539-572, June.
    7. Rainer Winkelmann, 1997. "How young workers get their training: A survey of Germany versus the United States," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 10(2), pages 159-170.
    8. Gersbach, Hans & Schmutzler, Armin, 2001. "A Product Market Theory of Worker Training," IZA Discussion Papers 327, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    14. Euwals, Rob & Winkelmann, Rainer, 2001. "Why Do Firms Train? Empirical Evidence on the First Labour Market Outcomes of Graduated Apprentices," IZA Discussion Papers 319, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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