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Firm's Investment in General Training and the Market for Skilled Labour

  • Boom, A.

An adverse selection model is analysed where firms can either train or hire a skilled worker. In equilibrium the market wage is determined by supply and demand.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Bergen in its series Norway; Department of Economics, University of Bergen with number 1101.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:bereco:1101
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Department of Economics, University of Bergen Fosswinckels Gate 6. N-5007 Bergen, Norway

Phone: (+47)55589200
Fax: (+47)55589210
Web page: http://www.uib.no/econ/
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  1. Daron Acemoglu & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2002. "Minimum Wages and On-the-Job Training," CEP Discussion Papers dp0527, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  2. Hans Gersbach & Armin Schmutzler, 2002. "A Product Market Theory of Worker Training," SOI - Working Papers 0214, Socioeconomic Institute - University of Zurich, revised Jan 2003.
  3. Acemoglu, Daron & Pischke, Jörn-Steffen, 1998. "The Structure of Wages and Investment in General Training," CEPR Discussion Papers 1833, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Loewenstein, Mark A & Spletzer, James R, 1998. "Dividing the Costs and Returns to General Training," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(1), pages 142-71, January.
  5. David H. Autor, 2001. "Why Do Temporary Help Firms Provide Free General Skills Training?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(4), pages 1409-1448.
  6. Anke S. Kessler & Christoph Lülfesmann, 2002. "The Theory of Human Capital Revisited: On the Interaction of General and Specific Investments," CESifo Working Paper Series 776, CESifo Group Munich.
  7. Brunello, Giorgio & Medio, Alfredo, 2000. "An Explanation of International Differences in Education and Workplace Training," IZA Discussion Papers 114, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. John M. Barron & Mark C. Berger & Dan A. Black, 1997. "On-the-Job Training," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number ojt.
  9. Katz, Eliakim & Ziderman, Adrian, 1990. "Investment in General Training: The Role of Information and Labour Mobility," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(403), pages 1147-58, December.
  10. Andrea Bassanini & Alison Booth & Giorgio Brunello & Maria De Paola & Edwin Leuven, 2006. "Workplace training in Europe," Post-Print halshs-00120601, HAL.
  11. Gary S. Becker, 1962. "Investment in Human Capital: A Theoretical Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70, pages 9.
  12. Euwals, Rob & Winkelmann, Rainer, 2001. "Why do Firms Train? Empirical Evidence on the First Labour Market Outcomes of Graduate Apprentices," CEPR Discussion Papers 2880, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  13. Harhoff, Dietmar & Kane, Thomas J, 1996. "Is the German Apprenticeship System a Panacea for the US Labour Market?," CEPR Discussion Papers 1311, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  14. Gary S. Becker, 1975. "Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis, with Special Reference to Education, Second Edition," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number beck75-1.
  15. Lindner, Axel, 1998. "Modelling the German system of vocational education," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(4), pages 411-423, December.
  16. Daron Acemoglu, 1997. "Training and Innovation in an Imperfect Labour Market," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(3), pages 445-464.
  17. Booth, Alison L & Zoega, Gylfi, 2000. "Why Do Firms Invest in General Training? 'Good' Firms and 'Bad' Firms as a Source of Monopsony Power," CEPR Discussion Papers 2536, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  18. Rainer Winkelmann, 1997. "How young workers get their training: A survey of Germany versus the United States," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 10(2), pages 159-170.
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