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A Simple Global Perspective on the US Slowdown, Boom-Bust Cycles and the Rise of Protectionism

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  • Juan Pablo Medina
  • Pablo García

Abstract

The global economy has experienced several significant developments during the recent years: the rising role of giant Asian economies in international trade; the 2008 financial crisis and the ensuing Great Recession in the US, with its propagation to the rest of the world; the sharp rise and subsequent burst of commodity prices over 2006-2009. In this paper we use a multi-region DSGE model for the global economy as a simple framework to understand the global response to these shocks and the importance of the propagation to different regions. The model is equipped to jointly determine exchange rates, trade balances and commodity prices across the world. We carry out several simulations with the model. First, we consider the US slowdown and its international propagation. Second, we explore a global boom-bust cycle driven by overoptimistic forecasts for productivity and their relationship with current account rebalancing. Finally, we analyze the global economic consequences of protectionism. We find that the effects in commodity prices, global output and demand tend to be amplified if the real exchange rates and real wages are more sluggish to adjust in some regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Juan Pablo Medina & Pablo García, 2009. "A Simple Global Perspective on the US Slowdown, Boom-Bust Cycles and the Rise of Protectionism," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 529, Central Bank of Chile.
  • Handle: RePEc:chb:bcchwp:529
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    1. Hamid Faruqee & Douglas Laxton & Dirk Muir & Paolo A. Pesenti, 2007. "Smooth Landing or Crash? Model-Based Scenarios of Global Current Account Rebalancing," NBER Chapters,in: G7 Current Account Imbalances: Sustainability and Adjustment, pages 377-456 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    6. Manuel Marfán & Juan Pablo Medina & Claudio Soto, 2009. "Overoptimism, Boom-Bust Cycles and Monetary Policy in Small Open Economies," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series,in: Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel & Carl E. Walsh & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel (Series (ed.), Monetary Policy under Uncertainty and Learning, edition 1, volume 13, chapter 14, pages 563-600 Central Bank of Chile.
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    Cited by:

    1. Justin Yifu Lin & Will Martin, 2010. "The financial crisis and its impacts on global agriculture," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(s1), pages 133-144, November.
    2. Lin, Justin Yifu & Martin, William J., 2009. "The Financial Crisis and Its Impact on the Global Agricultural Landscape," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 53208, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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