IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hal/cesptp/hal-00270511.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Estimating the Impact of Environmental SPS and TBT on International Trade

Author

Listed:
  • Lionel Fontagné

    () (CEPII - Centre d'Etudes Prospectives et d'Informations Internationales - Centre d'analyse stratégique, TEAM - Théories et Applications en Microéconomie et Macroéconomie - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Mondher Mimouni

    (ITC (UNCTAD-WTO) - International Trade Center - WTO - UNCTAD)

  • Jean-Michel Pasteels

    (ITC (UNCTAD-WTO) - International Trade Center - WTO - UNCTAD)

Abstract

According to WTO rules, governments are allowed to take measures in order to protect human health, as well as animal and plant health, provided that the enforced measures are not disguised protectionism. The SPS and TBT agreements try to ensure that the regulations enforced at the country level do not translate into unnecessary barriers to trade. Whether they succeed is a key empirical issue in the literature. Contrasting with previous studies focusing on single cases (e.g. aflatoxins), we adopt a new approach tackling the impact of such measures at the border across countries and industries. Our results generalise the finding of recent studies with a predominance of negative impacts of such measures on trade of fresh and processed food, while in the case of manufacturing products an insignificant or even positive impact is observed.

Suggested Citation

  • Lionel Fontagné & Mondher Mimouni & Jean-Michel Pasteels, 2005. "Estimating the Impact of Environmental SPS and TBT on International Trade," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00270511, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:cesptp:hal-00270511
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00270511
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hal:cesptp:hal-00270511. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (CCSD). General contact details of provider: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.