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The Role of Gender in Employment Polarization

Author

Listed:
  • Fabio Cerina

    () (University of Cagliari
    CRENoS)

  • Alessio Moro

    () (University of Cagliari
    Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM))

  • Michelle Petersen Rendall

    () (University of Zurich)

Abstract

We document that employment polarization in the 1980-2008 period in the U.S. is largely generated by women. For the latter, employment shares increase both at the bottom and at the top of the skill distribution, generating the typical U-shape polarization graph, while for men employment shares decrease in a similar fashion along the whole skill distribution. We show that a canonical model of skill-biased technological change augmented with a gender dimension, an endogenous market/home labor choice and a multi-sector environment accounts well for gender and overall employment polarization. The model also accounts for the absence of employment polarization during the 1960-1980 period, which is due to the at behavior of changes in women's employment shares along the skill distribution, and can reproduce the different evolution of employment shares across decades during the 1980-2008 period. The faster growth of skill-biased technological change since the 1980s accounts for a substantial part of the employment polarization generated by the model.

Suggested Citation

  • Fabio Cerina & Alessio Moro & Michelle Petersen Rendall, 2016. "The Role of Gender in Employment Polarization," Discussion Papers 1704, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM), revised Jan 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:cfm:wpaper:1704
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    File URL: http://www.centreformacroeconomics.ac.uk/Discussion-Papers/2017/CFMDP2017-04-Paper.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Vahagn Jerbashian, 2016. "Automation and Job Polarization: On the Decline of Middling Occupations in Europe," UB Economics Working Papers 2016/348, Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat d'Economia i Empresa, UB Economics.
    2. repec:kap:jecgro:v:23:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s10887-018-9160-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Sevinç, Orhun, 2017. "Skill-biased technical change and Labor market polarization:the role of skill heterogeneity within occupations," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86147, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Michael Bar & Moshe Hazan & Oksana Leukhina & David Weiss & Hosny Zoabi, 2018. "Why did rich families increase their fertility? Inequality and marketization of child care," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 23(4), pages 427-463, December.
    5. Gaetano Basso & Giovanni Peri & Ahmed Rahman, 2017. "Computerization and Immigration: Theory and Evidence from the United States," NBER Working Papers 23935, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Kathrin Ellieroth, 2017. "Cyclicality of Hours Worked by Married Women and Spousal Insurance," Caepr Working Papers 2017-009 Classification-D, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Economics Department, Indiana University Bloomington.
    7. Orhun Sevinc, 2017. "Skill-Biased Technical Change and Labor Market Polarization: The Role of Skill Heterogeneity Within Occupations," Discussion Papers 1728, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Job Polarization; Gender; Skill-biased Technological Change; Home Production;

    JEL classification:

    • E20 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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